ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / [email protected]
  • Season's Greetings from ISCA! Which physical activity are you looking forward to in 2022?
    Season's Greetings from all of us at ISCA! We are looking forward to the New Year - and can't wait to #FindOurMOVE again with our favourite physical activities. Which physical activity are you looking forward to in 2022? You can see what we are all looking forward to getting back to in the video below (spoiler alert: ISCA people certainly miss dancing).
    Season's Greetings from ISCA! Which physical activity are you looking forward to in 2022?
  • New Executive Committee, new strategy and more members confirmed at ISCA’s General Assembly
    After the successful MOVE Congress 2021, ISCA members gathered for the biennial General Assembly on 20 November to make some key decisions for the future of ISCA. Chaired by external expert Philippe de Witte and ISCA Finance Manager Elena Garcia Morales, the General Assembly took some major decisions based on the prepared materials in the Delegate File. As the democratic foundation of the organisation, the General Assembly delegates, members from across the world, elected the new ISCA Executive Committee for the next two years, as follows: President:Mr Mogens Kirkeby (Nominated by DGI, Denmark) Vice Presidents:Ms Maria Luiza Souza Dias (Nominated by SESC – Serviço Social do Comércio, Brazil)Ms Helen Vost, (Nominated by Youth Sport Trust International, UK) – new Executive Committee members:Ms Liliana Ortiz De La Cruz (Nominated by Fundación Pro Deporte y Recreaction para todos, Colombia)Ms Daniela Conti (Nominated by UISP, Italy) – newProf Dr Michael Tiemann (Nominated by German Gymnastics Federations, DTB, Germany)Mr Patrice Roder (Nominated by UFOLEP, France) – newMr Jakub Kalinowski (Nominated by V4SPORT Foundation, Poland) ISCA is working on the basis of 4-year strategies, and the General Assembly discussed and adopted a new strategy for the years 2022-2025: The strategy emphasises ISCA’s drive to succeed as a member-based umbrella, and prioritises digital development, convening power, and partnerships as ISCA’s strategic enablers. The MOVE Congress was adopted as a stand-alone operational pillar, complementing ISCA Projects, the NowWeMOVE Campaign, and Advocacy as the key ISCA intervention areas. (More information on pages 10-17 of the Delegate File). “ISCA is its members – its members are ISCA” is a mantra often heard in ISCA circles. 27 new members were formally adopted by the General Assembly, and welcomed to the network of global grassroots sport promoters. The General Assembly also reviewed and adopted a new membership offer and fee structure, reports from the continental chairs, as well as budgets and accounts, to name just a few. Full information on all these elements can be found in the abovementioned Delegate File. The minutes are available here and below for further information. Photos: Marie Oleinik and Laura-Maria Tiidla, ISCA
    New Executive Committee, new strategy and more members confirmed at ISCA’s General Assembly
  • Active seminar adds Amsterdam inspiration to Placemaking for Active Recreation Kit development
    After wrapping up the MOVE Congress 2021 in Brussels, ISCA’s Laska Nenova and Monika Resetar jumped over to Amsterdam to join an in-person training seminar for the Placemaking for Active Recreation Kit project (PARK). Placemaking Europe’s Anna Bradley, who also presented the project at the MOVE Congress, shares more on this active and interactive seminar. Placemaking Europe welcomed professionals working on physical activity and city design at the training on 24-25 November. It was a cross-pollinating event that started a conversation about how we can work together to make cities more conducive to physical activity, something we are working on as part of the P.A.R.K. project funded by Erasmus+. On the first day, we listened to presentations by Vivian Doumpa, Ramon Marrades and Anna Louise Bradley about the human-scale street design, how short-term interventions can become long-term change, and finally about the potential of placemaking for urban physical activity. Then in groups, we played The Place Game by Project for Public Spaces and analysed the public space around the Eye Filmmuseum. On the second day we had our bike tour where we first visited Boogieland [Kick] Boxing Club. Here, Jens van Dongen and Isabel Kooij told their inspiring story about how they started from a guerrilla action of placing punching bags in public spaces to a programme supported by the municipality of Amsterdam and making boxing accessible to all citizens specifically to support mental and physical health inclusively. After this stop, we then visited architect Sasa Radenovic in Westerpark. He shared with us the story of Aldo van Eyck's playgrounds and showed how a city can be a space for playful physical activity, inclusive of different age groups. We saw lively conversations and we are very happy that the training was an opportunity to share experiences and make connections. We will work on the future of physical activity in cities and on creating feasible solutions together with our project partners: BG Be Active, International Sport and Culture Association, MOVE, Power Jump - Bulgaria, DEPORTE PARA LA EDUCACIÓN Y LA SALUD and Sport for Education and Health (DES). Let's keep the conversation going! Find out more about the project here
    Active seminar adds Amsterdam inspiration to Placemaking for Active Recreation Kit development
  • European Parliament adopts important report which recognises the diversity of sport organisations
    Today, 23 November, the long-awaited report on the EU's Sports policy was adopted by the European Parliament. The report can be found here. The report follows the extensive study which was requested by the European Parliament’s CULT Committee. ISCA had significant fingerprints on that report, which was commented on here. There has been high political involvement in the drafting of the report, which is tabled by MEP Frankowski (EPP, pictured above and in the video below): The main challenge was whether the report should acknowledge the so-called European Sport Model. This model is a contested concept that in some definitions mean giving monopoly rights to single sport federations instead of acknowledging the diversity of sport organisations that engage Europeans all over the continent. Rather than acknowledging this model, the final report suggests “enhancing the principles of a European sports model” and “acknowledges the diversity of approaches across sports and countries”. ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby states: “The European Parliament supports the diversity of sport in Europe and the freedom of organisation. It is a democratic and inclusive position which underline the reality of the organisation of sport in Europe of today. Monopolies in sport, such as only one recognised organisation per sport, are a gone chapter of European history." The report follows the recent adoption of a renewed European Sports Charter by the Council of Europe, which also did not acknowledge the so-called European Sport Model. Next week, the Council of the EU will likely adopt its resolution, which (in the draft text) prefers to “explore and discuss with all sport stakeholders the key features of a European Sport Model by acknowledging the diversity of approaches…” By March 2022, the Commission will publish a study on the “European Model(s) of Sport” which will bring further evidence to the table on this highly contested concept.
    European Parliament adopts important report which recognises the diversity of sport organisations
  • WHO lead Dr Fiona Bull at MOVE Congress closing: We have to reinvent our system to meet physical activity targets
    For the MOVE Congress 2021, we at ISCA prioritised delivering a physical event, because we believe in the power of the physical meeting between people, and we wanted to enable our members and partners to come together to Reconnect, Rebuild and Restart. Some speakers were unable to be there with us in person, and we used our experience in delivering hybrid and online events to bring their expertise to the congress nonetheless. 300 participants, including 60 speakers plus performers, joined us in Brussels to be part of the MOVE Congress from 17-19 November 2021. In the plenary session on Friday 19 November, Dr Fiona Bull, Head of the Physical Activity Unit, World Health Organization (WHO) Department of Health Promotion greeted the MOVE Congress participants from Geneva and gave a motivational keynote reminding everyone of the value and need for their work as a Rebuild, Restart and Reinvent sport and physical activity promotion from 2021 and beyond. Her speech was followed by a live Q&A with ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby, who asked follow-up questions from the MOVE Congress stage. The plenary session was live streamed on ISCA’s Facebook channel to a wider online audience. “It’s with great regret I can’t be with you in person, as I have thoroughly enjoyed previous opportunities to join the MOVE Congress. But I’m absolutely delighted to be with you and say a few words to set off this final day of the Congress,” Dr Bull began. “I know many of you will be really enjoying it because it’s back to what we enjoy most: sharing our experiences, sharing the challenges and discussing how we can help more people be more active… I want to congratulate the organisers and all of you for this important theme, this Reconnecting, Restarting and Rebuilding, and I’m going to add to it by adding Reinventing.” The WHO’s Global Action Plan for Physical Activity has target of 15% improvement in physical activity levels across the world by 2030. But the pandemic delivered an unexpected blow to the initiatives supporting this goal, she noted. “Being active has become so important to us all during Covid and it reminds us how important it is in terms of its contributions to the global agenda [of] global health. We know, but let’s remind ourselves, the importance of the [UN’s] Sustainable Development Goals. There’s real concern now that Covid has set us back on the progress being made, but that progress itself was not enough. We needed it to be accelerating, and now [we’ve been hit by] Covid. Now we’ve got to double that acceleration to reach the target of improving good health and wellbeing and the WHO is the custodian of that target around non-communicable disease.” The updated WHO physical activity guidelines, published in November 2020, represented a reinvention when it comes to white paper recommendations. The pandemic prompted a quick changing of gears from prescribing minutes of moderate and vigorous physical activity to validating all forms of physical movement as a step in the right direction: “Let’s get it down to its bare facts – Every Move Counts,” she pointed out, reiterating the WHO’s slogan and adding, “Our task is evidence-based and clear.” She urged physical activity promoters at all levels to join forces with the WHO, the UN, the private sector, civil society and government “to build back better”, “to reinvent and ensure we are providing physical activity to everyone”, extending an invitation to use the resources developed by the WHO to convince colleagues, communities and governments to support sustainable initiatives. “We need to communicate the benefits… not just the physical benefits, but the mental health benefits and the social benefits to create more programmes for more people and address inequalities and we need to make sure that our systems will sustain this – not one-offs, not pilots, not demonstrations, but real change sustained.” Mogens Kirkeby asked whether physical activity had lost ground in policy-making due to the focus on combating Covid-19 and Dr Bull responded optimistically, pointing to raised awareness of regular exercise in the UK, Jamaica and Asia (for example) and emphasising that “We think at WHO that it is a must-have policy action area.” “I share your concern that physical activity has potentially lost ground. And yet, this is perhaps too simplistic because, at the community level, I think we have gained ground in the recognition due to the constraint, due to the confinement, due to the impact of Covid on how we live our lives. We’ve realised that moving has been central… so there’s an opportunity in this… In some countries there’s been increased focus on physical activity.” Nevertheless, the data she showed indicated that physical activity is still lagging behind other persistent public health priorities, including the fact that tobacco control has more regulatory support than physical activity promotion. Sustaining physical activity programmes is also hindered by intermittent funding that prevents organisations from “building and scaling” their work. So the pandemic is an important crossroads, she said. “We are at the very important stage of our work of creating and helping the world recover, rebuild and let’s use it to reinvent a stronger system together for better physical activity.” To take action in our sectors, Dr Bull listed three potential drivers that can complement the WHO’s Global Action Plan: sustained communications, better environments for physical activity, and engaging people through inclusive programmes. “I know that’s been a core theme of your conference and I congratulate you and look forward to hearing about your deliberations and suggestions.” Watch the full Day 3 plenary here Stay tuned for more opportunities to join in WHO and ISCA physical activity initiatives, coming soon. Visit the official MOVE Congress website for our full coverage of all sessions. By Rachel Payne, ISCA
    WHO lead Dr Fiona Bull at MOVE Congress closing: We have to reinvent our system to meet physical activity targets
Season's Greetings from ISCA! Which physical activity are you looking forward to in 2022?
Season's Greetings from all of us at ISCA! We are looking forward to the New Year - and can't wait to #FindOurMOVE again with our favourite physical activities. Which physical activity are you looking forward to in 2022? You can see what we are all looking forward to getting back to in the video below (spoiler alert: ISCA people certainly miss dancing).

You will like working with us!

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The MOVE Congress 2021 is the place to Reconnect, Rebuild and Restart after a year that turned the sport and physical activity sector upside down. It’s time to take charge and master a new era of your work – with the help and inspiration from experts, decision makers and your colleagues (yes, in person, not just behind the screen!)

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New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you in 2021. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

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ISCA ONLINE LEARNING

Boost your skills in sport and physical activity promotion by taking one of our free online courses - developed by people with practical experience and expertise in advocacy, social inclusion, outdoor facilities, fitness testing, sport diplomacy and social impact measurement.

 

Find the right course for you at learn.isca.org