ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • WHO Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity adopted
    The World Health Organisation's (WHO) Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity (GAPPA) was adopted this evening at the World Health Assembly in Geneva. The action plan will be launched officially in Lisbon on 4 June and ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg will attend the launch. The adoption of the action plan is a significant recognition of the value of physical activity in maintaining good health and fighting non-communicable diseases. ISCA and our members contributed to the draft throughout the process and we are happy to see that so many members states approved the plan. ISCA will continue promoting GAPPA through our work and through our social media advocacy campaign #GAPPA #ActiveVoice - and along with our members and partners we are committed to putting this plan into action. Read ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby's comment on the Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity 
    WHO Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity adopted
  • ISCA Awards 2018 call for applicants: Get recognised for your work in creating an urban space for an active lifestyle
    We want to celebrate your work! So this year, ISCA is awarding partnerships who have reimagined and transformed urban spaces into active spaces. We are calling for applications for three ISCA Awards categories for 2018: Green spaces (parks and other green areas), Black spaces (paved and asphalt spaces, including squares and roads) and Blue spaces (anywhere there is water, such as lakes, rivers or harbours). We call these spaces MOVEment Spaces because they enable citizens to enjoy their human right to MOVE. The combination of stakeholders can be from a variety of sectors including sport, health, leisure, education, transport, urban planning, architecture, local authorities, business and community groups. Our expert panel will award partnerships that demonstrate well-documented proof of success in working towards a common vision, meeting their objectives, having an impact on their communities, and exploring potential for their initiatives to be transferred to different contexts. We will also open the voting to the public in September and present one people’s choice award to one of the nominees from the “green”, “black” and “blue” spaces categories. Applications close on 10 September 2018 and the winners will be presented with their awards in Paris on 23 November.Feel free to share the call with exemplary partnerships in your network. Visit the website to find out more and submit an application here
    ISCA Awards 2018 call for applicants: Get recognised for your work in creating an urban space for an active lifestyle
  • “We felt it was our duty to do something for local refugees”: Danish tennis club boosts membership by opening its doors
    On 22 May, the ISCA team and partners in the Integration of Refugees through Sport (IRTS) project visited Birkerød Tennis Club north of Copenhagen in Denmark. Birkerød has seen an influx of refugees over the last few years, and when the first waves of people came Club chairman Jesper Tvermoes said he felt it was part of his and his club’s duty to do something to help take care of the people moving into the area, ensure that they could integrate and learn Danish. That’s why Jesper took an idea to the board that the club itself could get refugees involved to help them settle into the area. The board was unsure at first, and deliberated for some time, but with Jesper taking responsibility for this “project” they eventually backed it fully. After initial failed attempts to advertise the initiative online and through traditional media, the club reached out to the refugee community in person, and engaged a small number of people to come along to the club – even though they had never played tennis before – after seeing their skills in table tennis. Due to the circumstances of the refugees it was decided that to help them participate they would receive one year’s free membership, be given a racket and balls, and be afforded one free lesson a week. From this point onwards the refugee community in Birkerød started to get heavily involved in the tennis club! Now there are around 40 refugees who are members of the club, and during any one session there are 10-20 at the club, including a host of younger players, from children to teenagers. At first the club had it in mind that the refugees who wanted to play at the club should be able to travel independently to the location if they wanted to be involved. They soon realised, however, that while this worked for the adults, it was problematic for the children to use public transport to get there. Therefore, they decided that club members would pick up the children before the session and bring them to the club. As the children get older they will be expected to start coming on their own. At the club all communication is in Danish, and this has helped to integrate new arrivals, with all the children having excellent Danish skills and many of the adults also grasping the language very quickly. It has not only been sport and language that have helped many of the refugees integrate. The family environment and links formed with other club members have led to employment opportunities for some of the refugees, and permanent housing has even been sourced through these channels at times. Jesper and some of the refugees who were in attendance then answered a host of questions, from whether they preferred the classic one-handed backhand style to administrative matters. After the interesting, thorough insight into just how the tennis club had managed to have the success it has had in terms of integrating and involving refugees in the local community it was time to get into the action as the club had provided everyone with two courts to play tennis on for close to two hours! Everyone got involved, with a host of nationalities of all ages practicing their serves, forehands, backhands and smashes with each other! The power of sport and physical activity was on full display, as everyone got to know and understand each other better, and left with beaming smiles on their faces.By Alexander Appleyard-Keeling, ISCAPhotos by Lauriane Jagault, ISCA 
    “We felt it was our duty to do something for local refugees”: Danish tennis club boosts membership by opening its doors
  • ISCA launches new Human Right to MOVE video featuring MEPs
    ISCA has developed the concept of the Human Right to MOVE to promote physical activity as an essential part of our existence. Last year it was the central theme of our MOVE Congress in Birmingham and now it is part of our mission: “We empower organisations worldwide to enable citizens to enjoy their human right to move.” When ISCA was at the European Parliament in Brussels to promote No Elevators Day, we asked Members of European Parliament what they think of the Human Right to MOVE concept. Watch the video here and read their responses below. Rory Palmer, Member of European Parliament, S&D, UK“I think it’s a very interesting concept and certainly worth exploring and debating. I think we would need to be careful to make sure it wasn’t something that public authorities and governments could just pay lip service to, but it will be very important that we thought about how it would be implemented and it’s a right that people could enact. And that’s why it’s so important that we see member states and local governments investing in the right infrastructure, the right facilities to encourage people to move, to exercise, to take part in physical activity and sport.” Jeroen Lenaers, Member of European Parliament, EPP, Netherlands“I think everybody in the world should have the right to move, should have the right to play, should have the right to actively participate in sports and I think there should even be a human duty to move. If everybody moves, we are all fitter and as a society we’ll be healthier and we’ll be more prosper [sic].” Miroslav Mikolasik, Member of European Parliament, EPP, Slovakia“Look, this should be in schools, it should be in society, and I’m only sorry that some member states reduce the number of sports activities in their school curricula and I think we have to go the other way around and to promote sport and to have it like a right to health. It means that the right to move and the right to sport is part of the whole package.” Bogdan Wenta, Member of European Parliament, EPP, Poland“I think this is the time for this initiative as a practically fundamental right – it’s a human right to … discover… how important it is to move us – how important it is to do something for yourself, not only to go to the gym, not only to go to the sport club, but really around us. It really is a simple solution and that’s why I really appreciate such ideas as you propose.” Seb Dance, Member of European Parliament, S&D, UK“I look at my watch and see how many steps I’ve done each day and it’s pretty good in this place. But not everybody has that opportunity, not everybody can say to their employer, ‘Actually, I need to move. I can’t just be sat at this desk all day, I need to have elements of my work day that involve movement.’ It’s not easy, for example, to say to an employer ‘I want to take 20 minutes out of the day to be active, to move, to go for a walk’, or whatever it is. People need to have a sense of empowerment that they are entitled to that movement during the day, that it’s not just a leisure activity, it’s important to stay active throughout the day.” Julie Ward, Member of European Parliament, S&D, UK“It’s very important. I think that human rights should be the foundation for all our political work. So being reminded of some lesser known human rights, I think, is really significant. What we have to be really aware of is what are the barriers to that. So some people who have less mobility, people who, for example, have a physical or a sensory disability which makes it more difficult for them to engage in some activities, we need to remove those barriers. I think remembering the human right and promoting it and making people aware of it is really important. But then we have to fight to remove the barriers so that we can have true participation.” Sean Kelly, Member of European Parliament, EPP, Ireland“I think it’s a good idea, because the quality of life really decides everything. The better your quality of life, the happier you are, and of course health is intrinsic to that. So if you have people who are active and feel good in themselves, then that’s a very important aspect of developing quality of life… The more action we have, the more movement we have, the better. We weren’t meant to be stationary or sedentary, we were meant to move around.”  
    ISCA launches new Human Right to MOVE video featuring MEPs
  • Why continuity and innovation are equally important to sports clubs: Comment by ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby
    Graphic by UISP.  Last weekend I met a 70-year-old. Not a 70-year-old person, but rather a well-known member of ISCA. I joined our Italian member organisation UISP in celebrating its 70th anniversary with a seminar on advocacy for physical activity. 70 years is quite some time and we can congratulate UISP and other organisations for being able to be a relevant civil society organisation for several decades. Well done! Sport organisations both at the club level and umbrella organisation level have different histories across the globe. Some of the oldest – still existing – sport clubs are German clubs with more than 200 years of history, and Czech Sokol Organisation has over 150 years. It is quite amazing that a voluntary based civil society organisation like a sport club with few hundreds or a few thousands of members can exist for so long. That is important continuity. On the other hand, the clubs-based sport sector also depends on the development and creation of new clubs with new aims and priorities. The creation of new clubs is important for at least two reasons: First, some clubs close/stop existing so new clubs are needed. Second, sometimes development and innovation is easier by starting a new initiative or founding new clubs than changing existing ones. Assisting in the creation of new clubs and other organisations that can provide relevant activities to citizens is therefore one important task in giving citizens better access to physical activity. The diagram below is from Germany. It shows the founding year of the existing 90,000 sport clubs in Germany. (Gründungsjahr = Founding year). The data are from 2014 and show that more than 20,000 clubs (23.3%), in this case in Germany, have been founded after 1990. And it is an ongoing process. For a national sport organisation with clubs as members, the ratio of new clubs founded is an import key figure. It indicates some of the innovative dynamics. With this I wish you a good week – no matter if it will be taking part in a young club or a 70+ year-old one – as long as they are relevant. News: UISP turns 70 (in Italian)
    Why continuity and innovation are equally important to sports clubs: Comment by ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby
WHO Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity adopted
The World Health Organisation's (WHO) Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity (GAPPA) was adopted this evening at the World Health Assembly in Geneva. The action plan will be launched officially in Lisbon on 4 June and ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg will attend the launch. The adoption of the action plan is a significant recognition of the value of physical activity in maintaining good health and fighting non-communicable diseases. ISCA and our members contributed to the draft throughout the process and we are happy to see that so many members states approved the plan. ISCA will continue promoting GAPPA through our work and through our social media advocacy campaign #GAPPA #ActiveVoice - and along with our members and partners we are committed to putting this plan into action. Read ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby's comment on the Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity 

You will like working with us!

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 7th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week will take place on 28 May-3 June 2018. Stay tuned for the dates of MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil).

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New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you later in 2018. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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