ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • Diplomacy is an opportunity for us in grassroots sport: Try the first Grassroots Sport Diplomacy online course
    Now is a very exciting time! Over the past two years we have developed the concept of Grassroots Sport Diplomacy together with our partners and diplomacy experts from across the world. Along the way, we have discovered that Grassroots Sport Diplomacy gives us a brand new angle to our work. And this angle will allow us to find new partners, new opportunities, new activities – and from today, a range of brand new resources including a free online course.The very first Grassroots Sport Diplomacy online course is now open on the International Sport and Culture Association’s (ISCA) online learning platform learn.isca.org and can be accessed for free and completed at your own pace. We hope it will inspire you as a grassroots sport or physical activity professional and anyone interested in international relations or sport for development to get started in this field. With support from the EU’s Erasmus+ Sport programme, ISCA and our partners have designed the Grassroots Sport Diplomacy online course to capture learning points and experiences gathered from a mapping of different types of diplomacy, an extensive stakeholder consultation and, seven pilot actions that were tested during the project. How you can use the Grassroots Sport Diplomacy course to your advantageDiplomacy is an opportunity for us in grassroots sport. It is value-based communication and exchange across borders. It has in fact been taking place as citizen-to-citizen engagement for centuries – maybe you have been part of international exchanges in grassroots sport as well? But so far, this work has been taking place outside of the governmental and political radars. Would you like your work to be recognised as a Grassroots Sport Diplomacy action? Join us as one of the frontrunners in this space by completing the online course and get in touch – we want to hear what you have learned or about any existing experiences you can share. Your professional development in 2020 starts hereBy completing four modules and utilising the learning materials you should be able to describe Grassroots Sport Diplomacy and be able distinguish it from sport diplomacy, cultural diplomacy and other related concepts. You will learn how to identify key actors who carry out Grassroots Sport Diplomacy, and how to approach relevant stakeholders who can work with you on Grassroots Sport Diplomacy actions. There are also examples of Grassroots Sport Diplomacy for your inspiration. We believe that after completing the full course you will understand how to design and develop a Grassroots Sport Diplomacy initiative of your own. We have a chance to contribute to better diplomatic actions through grassroots sport – let’s take the first step together! Watch our video introduction to the Grassroots Sport Diplomacy courseTake the course here: https://learn.isca.org/courses/grassroots-sport-diplomacy/Visit the official Grassroots Sport Diplomacy website The Grassroots Sport Diplomacy course was developed by the following project partners: International Sport and Culture Association (coordinator), European Observatory of Sport and Employment (France), Think Tank Sport and Citizenship (France), French Institute for International and Strategic Studies (France), Danish National Olympic Committee and Sport Confederation (Denmark), UBAE (Spain), UISP (Italy), National School, University and Leisure Sport Federation (Hungary), Portuguese Institute for Sport and Youth (Portugal), and SESC São Paulo (Brazil).
    Diplomacy is an opportunity for us in grassroots sport: Try the first Grassroots Sport Diplomacy online course
  • ISCA supports Sporting World Pledge for Refugees ahead of next week’s Global Refugee Forum
    The International Sport and Culture Association (ISCA) has joined over 70 organisations, led by UNHCR and the International Olympic Committee, in signing a world pledge to help young refugees discover their potential through sports. UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) announced today that the different entities – including National Olympic Committees, international sporting federations, national associations, clubs, and civil society organisations working through sport – are pledging to provide sporting opportunities to young refugees. Recognising the transformative power of sport, UNHCR has worked closely with the Olympic Refugee Foundation (ORF) and the IOC on this global initiative, ahead of the first-ever Global Refugee Forum in Geneva on 17 and 18 December 2019. The three pledges are: To promote and ensure access for all refugees, without distinction of any kind, to safe and inclusive sporting facilities.To increase availability and access to organised sports and sport-based initiatives for refugee and hosting communities, actively considering age, gender, ability and other diversity needs.To promote and facilitate equal access to and participation of refugees in sporting events and competitions at all levels. ISCA shared its contribution to the Integration of Refugees through Sport by highlighting the free Integration of Refugee Through Sport online learning course, which is open to individuals, civil society organisations, local communities, social services, education institutions and others to find out how to implement sport and physical activities for refugees, understand the different principles of integration and to learn or improve skills and competences working with refugees. The course is available at learn.isca.org ISCA also contributed its upcoming Integration of Refugees through Sport networking platform and thematic congress planned to take place in Europe in 2021. Signatories join forces from around the worldOrganisations making pledges alongside ISCA include World Athletics, the International Judo Federation, Special Olympics and International Paralympic Committee, the Bangladesh, English and Republic of Ireland Football Associations, the AC Milan Foundation, Council of Southern Africa Football Associations, and Olympic Committees from 12 countries. A declaration signed by those pledging recognises that for children and young people uprooted by war or persecution, sport is much more than a leisure activity. It’s an opportunity to be included and protected – a chance to heal, develop and grow. The signatories are also calling for sports organisations around the world to join them in offering sporting opportunities to refugee and internally displaced young people, especially those living in their communities.The full list of entities pledging and their joint statement can be found here. UN and IOC welcome the broad-reaching support from sport sector“We wholeheartedly welcome these important commitments. They clearly demonstrate that the sporting world stands with refugees,” said the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Filippo Grandi. “This genuinely global and collective effort is crucial for promoting sports programmes to help young refugees build confidence, their physical and mental health, discover their potential and restore the prospect of a better future.” The President of the IOC, Thomas Bach, who will be presenting the pledges on behalf of the signatories at the upcoming Global Refugee Forum, also welcomed the support. “Through sport, the IOC has been supporting refugees around the world for many years,” said the IOC President Thomas Bach.” More recently, together with UNHCR, we created the Olympic Refuge Foundation. From this experience we know that for children and young people uprooted by war or persecution, sport is much more than a leisure activity”. “The pledges that we are making today reaffirm the commitment from the sports movement and key partners – from governments to NGOs – to play their part in supporting refugees. I am pleased to see that over 70 organisations are already part of the sports coalition, and I would hope that more organisations join us in the lead-up to the Global Refugee Forum.” Background NotesThe Global Compact on Refugees, the international framework for strengthened cooperation and solidarity with refugees and affected host countries, specifically recognises the contribution of sport and sporting entities in the protection and well-being of refugees and the internally displaced. The sporting commitments along with other contributions will be highlighted at the forthcoming Global Refugee Forum. Adapted from official UNHCR press release, published here. UNHCR Sporting World Pledge for Refugees Media Contacts:Nick Sore, sore@unhcr.org, mobile +41 79 447 0275Claire Roberts Lamont, lamont@unhcr.org, mobile +44 7445 607 729Emmanuelle Moreau, emmanuelle.moreau@olympic.org, mobile +41 21 621 6412 
    ISCA supports Sporting World Pledge for Refugees ahead of next week’s Global Refugee Forum
  • #BeActive Beach Games manual and resources set for 2020 launch
    The results of the first BeActive Beach Games, organised in Latvia and Portugal this summer, are being compiled into a BeActive Beach Games manual and resources that are set to be launched in time for the Northern Hemisphere summer in 2020. The manual, developed by a consortium of Erasmus+ project partners, led by the Latvian Sports Federation Council and including ISCA, will outline how to organise beach sports and games on natural and artificial beaches, provide videos and descriptions of various beach sports and activities, and offer a policy note for decision-makers at different levels – municipal, national and European – to support the Games model and to promote a physically active way of life. On 17-18 August, the BeActive Beach Games organised by the Latvian Sports Federation Council (LSFC) took place in the urban environment of Riga – Kipsala and Lucavsala - and on September 7-8 - on the natural ocean beach of Portimao, Portugal. "The goal of developing the Beach Games is to expand the #BeActive movement by offering new ideas on how to shape the environment and culture in different places to promote an active lifestyle as much as possible. Relaxing by the water is one of the most popular ways of spending time in summer in Europe, so the focus of the project is to promote beach sports activities. The first BeActive Beach Games organised this year proved that it is possible to create games that are successful and suitable for different ages and abilities, and adapt them to different environments. Moreover, our focus was not as much on the competition as on the notion of just being physically active," Einars Fogelis, the president of the Latvian Sports Federation Council (LSFC), points out. The BeActive Beach Games model is designed to be accessible to everyone, allowing organisers to change or re-design the rules to match the skills and capabilities of players, and taking into account the environment, whether its organised on a natural or an artificial beach. The manual will be complemented with examples from the Beach Games organised in Latvia and Portugal in relation to planning, organising and promoting BeActive Beach Games, requirements for the necessary infrastructure and equipment, as well as recommendations for the inclusion of different groups of participants. "The social project launched by the Latvian Floorball Union, involving children and young people living in orphanages, is one of the great examples,” LSFC Head of Sport Development, Dace Zvaigzne says. “During the first BeActive Beach Games held in Lucavsala in August 2019, more than 30 children and young people from two orphanages joined in floorball and relay activities and participated in team games by competing with experienced athletes. Not only did these young people develop their physical skills, but more importantly they became aware of a fulfilling life and understood that each of them could ‘become a champion’. This is the most important aspect of the Games." The manual will include detailed information on the various organisational stages of the games such as planning, building partnerships, coordinating and evaluating the event. It will address issues relating to the Games’ organisation, technical requirements, budget, security and communication. The latest information on the project can be found on the official website and by following the hashtag #BeActiveAtBeach Project partnersLatvian Sports Federation Council (lead), the Estonian Beach Sports Federation, Lithuanian Union of Sports Federations, Portuguese Institute of Sports and Youth, Union of Sports Federations in Catalonia, Italian National Democratic Organisation of Social Action. ISCA and TAFISA are strategic partners of the project.
    #BeActive Beach Games manual and resources set for 2020 launch
  • CHANGE project partners embark on skills and competence mapping in sport for development
    A mapping of the skills and competences that are typically needed or acquired when working in sport for development is now under way in the EU-supported CHANGE project. Partners from nine organisations across Europe gathered in Copenhagen on 26 and 27 of November for the second full partner meeting, which was hosted by the International Sport and Culture Association (ISCA). The CHANGE project is co-funded by the EU’s Erasmus+ Programme and aims to develop professional standards and education in the area of sport for development through lead partner the European Observatoire of Sport and Employment’s (EOSE) 7-Step Model for lifelong learning and workforce development. The model has previously been used to outline skills and competences among staff working in sports administration, in golf associations and clubs, and among referees and sports officials. The first day of the meeting began with a theoretical discussion in sport for development led by Stephen Robson from Leeds Beckett University. Stephen led the group through a series of activities to ‎recap and confirm a common agreement on the context for the project and look at definitions of sport for development. All partners agreed sport for development relates to the intentional use of sport to bring about positive change. Step 1 of the 7 Step Model is about research and the partners will carry out comprehensive desk research and interview a wide range of stakeholders in sport for development at the local, national, European and international level to gather a range of perspectives on the topic. EOSE Skills Development Manager Geoff Carroll introduced the group to the planned methodology to be used in the project to define competence and develop occupational/ professional standards for the area of sport for development. He then collected ideas on how to develop occupational standards through functional analysis and the various ‎uses and benefits of agreeing standards for the area of sport for development. The meeting was not only confined to the board room, with the discussions giving way to some friendly competition on the Petanque course at the end of the first working day. The much welcomed movement break saw the “Loch Ness Vikings” emerge as the victors, with hosts ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby (Denmark) and EOSE Director of Standards Ben Gittus (Scotland) taking out the inaugural CHANGE project Petanque tournament (pictured below). The partners will gather again at Women Win’s headquarters in Amsterdam in April 2020 after the completion of the research and data collection phase.CHANGE project partners: European Observatoire of Sport and Employment (EOSE); International Sport and Culture Association (ISCA); University of Cassino and Southern Lazio (UNICAS); Leeds Beckett University; The Greek General Secretariat for Sports; The Italian Sport for All Association (USIP); Sport Union of Slovenia (SUS); StreetGames; and Women Win.Contact: Ben Gittus – EOSE Director of Standards – ben.gittus@eose.org
    CHANGE project partners embark on skills and competence mapping in sport for development
  • Grassroots Sport Diplomacy project travels to the Middle East as ISCA leads workshop in Saudi Arabia
    In recognition of ISCA and our project partners’ progress in pioneering the concept of Grassroots Sport Diplomacy, ISCA Head of Projects Saska Benedicic Tomat and Vice President Toni Llop were given the unique opportunity to deliver a workshop on Grassroots Sport Diplomacy in Saudi Arabia last week. The event launched the Grassroots Sport Diplomacy concept on its third continent this year, after having been piloted in Europe and Latin America through ISCA’s EU-supported project. The European Union's EU Policy and Outreach Partnership (EUPOP Global) invited ISCA to share its expertise in this emerging field with 55 leaders of 30 sport organisations or federations in Riyadh, including the Saudi Sport For All Federation, Saudi Mass Participation Federation, and the Saudi Arabian Olympic Committee. The workshop was organised by the European Union and Saudi General Sport Authority and Leadership Institute in connection with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030. Among other developmental goals, Vision 2030 aims to promote volunteering and “raise the non-profit sector’s contribution to GDP from less than 1% to 5%”. This was the first opportunity for the workshop’s many participants representing non-profit organisations to brainstorm and outline a grassroots diplomatic action they would like to pilot in their country or community in 2020, following the step-by-step guide now available in the new Grassroots Sport Diplomacy course at learn.isca.org. It was also the perfect opportunity to – literally – roll out ISCA’s new Grassroots Sport Diplomacy cubes like dice across the workshop’s round tables. The six sides of the cubes represent each of the six steps outlined in the course and are a colourful introduction to “How to Become a Grassroots Sport Diplomat”. (Please contact us at info@isca-web.org if you would like know more or get your hands on this interactive learning and awareness-raising tool.) ISCA Vice President Toni Llop, whose organisation UBAE is a partner and pilot action coordinator in the Grassroots Sport Diplomacy project, said the workshop was a fitting recognition of the project’s achievements and potential to grow as a field of work. “It has been a pleasure and an amazing experience to represent ISCA in a workshop based on Grassroots Sport Diplomacy in Saudi Arabia,” he said. “Thanks to the work developed by a group of people during two years’ work in the Grassroots Sport Diplomacy project development and implementation, Saska and I were able to lead the workshop where delegates from different sport organisations took an active part (following ISCA’s active meeting methdds, of course).” ISCA is now exploring ways to continue collaborating with Saudi Arabian non-profit sport organisations through the NowWeMOVE campaign and resources developed through ISCA projects such as MOVEment Spaces and Good Governance in Grassroots Sport. Find out more about the Grassroots Sport Diplomacy project and try out our free online course here.  The Grassroots Sport Diplomacy project is co-funded by the EU's Erasmus+ programme under Collaborative Partnerships in the Field of Sport.By Rachel Payne, ISCA 
    Grassroots Sport Diplomacy project travels to the Middle East as ISCA leads workshop in Saudi Arabia
Diplomacy is an opportunity for us in grassroots sport: Try the first Grassroots Sport Diplomacy online course
Now is a very exciting time! Over the past two years we have developed the concept of Grassroots Sport Diplomacy together with our partners and diplomacy experts from across the world. Along the way, we have discovered that Grassroots Sport Diplomacy gives us a brand new angle to our work. And this angle will allow us to find new partners, new opportunities, new activities – and from today, a range of brand new resources including a free online course.The very first Grassroots Sport Diplomacy online course is now open on the International Sport and Culture Association’s (ISCA) online learning platform learn.isca.org and can be accessed for free and completed at your own pace. We hope it will inspire you as a grassroots sport or physical activity professional and anyone interested in international relations or sport for development to get started in this field. With support from the EU’s Erasmus+ Sport programme, ISCA and our partners have designed the Grassroots Sport Diplomacy online course to capture learning points and experiences gathered from a mapping of different types of diplomacy, an extensive stakeholder consultation and, seven pilot actions that were tested during the project. How you can use the Grassroots Sport Diplomacy course to your advantageDiplomacy is an opportunity for us in grassroots sport. It is value-based communication and exchange across borders. It has in fact been taking place as citizen-to-citizen engagement for centuries – maybe you have been part of international exchanges in grassroots sport as well? But so far, this work has been taking place outside of the governmental and political radars. Would you like your work to be recognised as a Grassroots Sport Diplomacy action? Join us as one of the frontrunners in this space by completing the online course and get in touch – we want to hear what you have learned or about any existing experiences you can share. Your professional development in 2020 starts hereBy completing four modules and utilising the learning materials you should be able to describe Grassroots Sport Diplomacy and be able distinguish it from sport diplomacy, cultural diplomacy and other related concepts. You will learn how to identify key actors who carry out Grassroots Sport Diplomacy, and how to approach relevant stakeholders who can work with you on Grassroots Sport Diplomacy actions. There are also examples of Grassroots Sport Diplomacy for your inspiration. We believe that after completing the full course you will understand how to design and develop a Grassroots Sport Diplomacy initiative of your own. We have a chance to contribute to better diplomatic actions through grassroots sport – let’s take the first step together! Watch our video introduction to the Grassroots Sport Diplomacy courseTake the course here: https://learn.isca.org/courses/grassroots-sport-diplomacy/Visit the official Grassroots Sport Diplomacy website The Grassroots Sport Diplomacy course was developed by the following project partners: International Sport and Culture Association (coordinator), European Observatory of Sport and Employment (France), Think Tank Sport and Citizenship (France), French Institute for International and Strategic Studies (France), Danish National Olympic Committee and Sport Confederation (Denmark), UBAE (Spain), UISP (Italy), National School, University and Leisure Sport Federation (Hungary), Portuguese Institute for Sport and Youth (Portugal), and SESC São Paulo (Brazil).

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you in 2020. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

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MOVE CONGRESS

Catch up on the coverage from the 9th MOVE Congress here, where you will find stories on all of the plenary sessions and conference tracks. Speakers’ presentations are now available on our SlideShare page.

 

If you were there, see if you can spot yourself in our highlight videos and gallery on Facebook or YouTube. If you missed it, now is the time to put a mark in your calendar for the 10th edition in October 2021.

 

Visit the official MOVE Congress website

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