ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • ISCA Awards for MOVEment Spaces presented to winners in an array of colour and fun
    The ISCA Awards ceremony wrapped up the programme with a colourful and – at times – unpredictable presentation of four awards recognising partnerships who have turned urban spaces into active spaces.  The winners, announced in October, were Fitness-Locations from DTB in Germany (green space – parks), Looking for a Place to Dream from GAME Lebanon (black space – asphalt or paved areas), and Bathing Zones from the City of Copenhagen, Culture and Leisure Department in Denmark (blue space – water), and the People’s Choice award went to Healthy Ireland: Healthy Cities and Counties, who created Swim Distance Markers in Galway Bay. Four Lego trophies designed by ISCA Youth Officer Alexander Appleyard Keeling were presented to Pia Pauly and Luli Gonzalez from DTB, Ida Brix from GAME, Mira Kirk Hedemann from the City of Copenhagen, and Fiona Donovan from Healthy Ireland: Healthy Cities and Counties, who all took part in the seminar and presented their partnerships' award-winning initiatives at the MOVEment Spaces closing meeting. ISCA’s Youth Officers also turned heads at the ceremony by delivering the awards by skateboard, in swimming trunks, in yoga tights, and in much-too-familiar David Hasselhoff-esque red boardshorts, before leading an impromptu ISCA-disco dance full of moves that epitomise “everyday” physical activity: from shovelling snow, to picking fruit to moving the lawn. Read more about the award winners Watch the full ceremony, including the ISCA-disco, on the ISCA Facebook page
    ISCA Awards for MOVEment Spaces presented to winners in an array of colour and fun
  • Moving People seminar in Paris connects project partners and high-profile speakers with a shared ambition
    The second Moving People – Moving Europe conference on 23 November brought together 175 participants representing 88 organisations from 32 countries in Paris for a one-day seminar underlining the value of alliances that can increase physical activity levels not only in Europe, but across the world.ISCA created the seminar in 2016 as a way of bringing partners from different Erasmus+ projects together to hold their closing and progress meetings in one place, to network and learn from each other and meet invited speakers from institutions such as the EU Sport Unit, WHO and public health authorities, as well as industry experts. The 2018 edition delivered an even more extensive programme including presentations from Lea Nash Castro from WHO Europe (pictured first below) on the way forward for the Global Action Plan for Physical Activity, Damien Combredet (pictured second below) on the promised grassroots legacy of the 2024 Paris Olympic Games, and Michael Shiosaki (pictured third below) from Seattle Parks on how better city planning is needed to create active urban spaces. Damien Combredet, who is the Head of Legacy for the City of Paris’ General Delegation for the Olympic and Paralympic Games, emphasised that the city is “looking for local solutions that work” and is inviting input on how it can reduce inequality when it comes to accessing facilities for everyday physical activity. StreetGames CEO Jane Ashworth presented examples from her NGO’s experience in the UK, reinforcing that locally run initiatives are vital in reaching the target group that decision makers and planners aim to make more active.“Locally trusted organisations are far more credible than the state [in achieving these goals],” she said. “They have access to disadvantaged areas and the tools and techniques needed to provide the evidence based of what works to more people.” Lea Nash Castro, a Technical Consultant at WHO Europe, agreed that “without support and actions at grassroots levels, plans [such as the Global Action Plan for Physical Activity] would be difficult to carry out” and described community based organisations as a “goldmine we should utilise” to ensure the plans are acted upon where it matters. All speakers returned to the stage for a panel discussion and remained at the seminar to meet the project partners, join in the ActiveVoice (led by ISCA), MOVEment Spaces (led by ISCA) and Us Girls (led by StreetGames) project workshops, and explore opportunities for collaboration and further networking. ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby later commented that this interaction is a testament to the growing movement of physical activity promoters worldwide. “175 participants from 88 organisations and 32 countries underline that ‘our’ sector is filled with people looking and caring far beyond their own ‘noses’,” he said. The full programme of the day is available below. By Rachel Payne, ISCA 
    Moving People seminar in Paris connects project partners and high-profile speakers with a shared ambition
  • New Active Healthy Kids report reveals childhood inactivity is at crisis point
    PRESS RELEASE – ADELAIDE, Australia – Children around the world are not moving enough to maintain healthy growth and development, according to a global report released today. A new report released at the Movement to Move conference in Adelaide this week by the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance (AHKGA) compared 49 countries from six continents to assess global trends in childhood physical activity in developed and developing nations, resulting in the “Global Matrix 3.0” comparison of grades. ISCA Executive Committee member Jakub Kalinowski, the President of the V4Sport foundation in Poland, was a speaker at the event, presenting the work his organisation and ISCA members such as BG Be Active in Bulgaria have done to complete Active Healthy Kids Report Cards in their countries. The report revealed that modern lifestyles – increases in screen time, the growing urbanization of communities and the rise in automation of previously manual tasks – are contributing to a pervasive public health problem that must be recognized as a global priority. “Global trends, including excessive screen time, are contributing to a generation of inactive children and putting them on a dangerous path,” said Professor Mark Tremblay, President of the AHKGA and Senior Scientist at the CHEO Research Institute in Canada. “We have a collective responsibility to change this because inactive children are at risk for adverse physical, mental, social and cognitive health problems. This generation will face a range of challenges, including the impacts of climate change, increasing globalization, and the consequences of rapid technological change. They will need to become habitually physically active in order to grow into healthy, resilient adults who can survive and thrive in a changing world.” The AHKGA international comparison involved 517 experts who produced 49 country report cards, grading 10 common indicators related to the physical activity of children and youth. The resulting report examines global patterns, and highlights how our changing world is affecting children’s physical activity levels. Increases in screen time and a growing reliance on technology are taking up crucial time that could be better spent engaged in a wide range of physical activities; and an increased use of motorized transport is changing physical activity levels globally. “Pushing back against these lifestyle shifts requires social engineering, not just built engineering, and the challenges vary depending on each country’s stage of development,” said Dr. Tremblay. “It will take many facets of society working together to shift behaviours to preserve and promote our children’s right to play and be active. We hope this report will be a call to action for societies around the world.” Learning from each otherCountries with the most active children and youth overall, including Slovenia, Zimbabwe and Japan, each rely on very different approaches to get kids moving but what is consistent among all of them is that physical activity is driven by pervasive cultural norms. Being active is not just a choice, but a way of life. Slovenia obtained the best grades for Overall Physical Activity (A−), Family and Peers (B+), and Government (A), and received an overall average grade of B.A notable feature in Slovenia is the importance of sport for the culture of this almost 30-year old country as “Slovenes tend to view sports as an effective tool in fostering national identity among citizens and making successful global identity claims.” Zimbabwe reports above-average grades in Overall Physical Activity (C+) and Sedentary Behaviours (B).Overall physical activity is mostly affected by active transportation which, for the majority of the children in Zimbabwe, is a necessity in everyday life. Japan had the best grades for Active Transportation (A−) and Physical Fitness (A), and had no grades lower than C−.Japan has a highly established “walking to school practice” that has been implemented since the School Education Act enforcement order, enacted in 1953. It states that public elementary schools should be located within no more than 4 km, and for public junior high schools no more than 6 km from the student’s home. “There much we can learn from each other to improve the grades around the world,” said Professor Peter Katzmarzyk, AHKGA Vice-President and Associate Executive Director for Population and Public Health Sciences at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. “Physical inactivity is a global concern and can no longer be ignored. For the good of our children’s health and futures, we need to build physical activity into all societies, and change social norms to get kids moving.” About the Global MatrixThe global comparisons were led by the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance (AHKGA; www.activehealthykids.org), a not-for-profit organization dedicated to powering the movement to get kids moving. Each country’s research process to determine grades was based on the framework from the ParticipACTION Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. Ten common indicators were compared: Overall Physical Activity, Organized Sport and Physical Activity, Active Play, Active Transportation, Sedentary Behavior, Physical Fitness, Family and Peers, School, Community and Environment, and Government. Report Cards from each of the 49 countries, as well as the results of the global comparisons, were presented at the opening plenary of the Movement to Move Conference in Adelaide, Australia and published in the Journal of Physical Activity and Health on November 27, 2018. Complete details of the Global Matrix 3.0, each country’s grades, report cards, priorities for action, quotes from country leaders and more are available at www.activehealthykids.org. The “Global Matrix 1.0” (2014, 15 countries) and “Global Matrix 2.0” (2016, 38 countries) findings are also available on the AHKGA website. The AHKGA is committed to informing, guiding and facilitating solutions to the global childhood inactivity crisis. This Global Matrix 3.0 confirms there are challenges for children, communities and cultures around the world. Identified priorities for action include: Creating a global movement for comprehensive school physical activity programs that support and allow ALL children and youth to meet the physical activity guidelines through a variety of strategic interventions (e.g., active recess options, physical activity breaks, compulsory physical education).Creating a global culture of active kids / active people in all settings, prioritizing active transportation above other modes of transportation.Investing in comprehensive social interventions and research to improve implementation and uptake strategies to manage recreational screen time among children and youth.Developing a standardized global surveillance system of the physical activity and related indicators among children and youth to fill the current gaps, especially in low- and medium-income countries. Further information on solutions to “improve the grade” is available at: www.activehealthykids.orgwww.participaction.com/en-cawww.isca-web.org/english/www.who.int/ncds/prevention/physical-activity/en For more information, please contact:Dr. Mark Tremblay, President, AHKGAmtremblay@cheo.on.ca+1-613-983-6329Aynsley Morris, Director of Communications, CHEO Research Instituteamorris@cheo.on.ca+1-613-737-7600 x4144 Please follow the link below for the full pres release, including a complete table of grades from all countries. 
    New Active Healthy Kids report reveals childhood inactivity is at crisis point
  • Budapest to host MOVE Congress in October 2019
    Together with our Hungarian partner the National School, University and Leisure Sport Federation, ISCA has revealed today that Budapest will host the ninth MOVE Congress from 16-18 October 2019.The MOVE Congress is one of the world’s only conferences dedicated to recreational sport and physical activity. Next year’s event is expected to be the biggest yet, offering unmatched opportunities for 500 participants spanning six continents and sectors including health, sport, education, international relations and urban planning to meet and discover new ways of working together on physical activity promotion. Registration will open in March 2019, and the first keynote speakers will be revealed in January. The conference will be held at the Budapest Congress Centre. National School, University and Leisure Sport Federation President Gábor Balogh says that hosting the MOVE Congress is a perfect opportunity to showcase the immense value of grassroots sport and physical activity promotion with examples from across the globe. “I’m personally proud to host the MOVE Congress, one of the leading international events aimed at promoting grassroots sport and physical activity. In 2019, Budapest also becomes the European Capital of Sport, which will draw a great deal of attention to sporting events in our country,” he says. “Therefore, we have a special ambition in this regard: we have to show that sport is not only competitive sport and shall demonstrate that physical activity goes well beyond sport. We have to show the power of grassroots sport organisations to the world and on the other hand, we want to highlight new aspects, approaches and knowledge to the participants of the MOVE Congress.” At the HIPE conference this afternoon in Budapest, ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby, via video, extended a warm welcome to participants to save the date for the MOVE Congress 2019. “Together with incredibly good hosts, we are delighted to invite you to the MOVE Congress 2019 in Budapest, Hungary. If you are interested in sport for all, grassroots sport and physical activity, then the MOVE Congress in Budapest in October 2019 is the place to be.” The MOVE Congress is held every two years and previous hosts include Copenhagen (2009, 2015), Frankfurt (2010), Paris (2011), Sao Paulo (2012), Barcelona (2013), Rome (2014) and Birmingham (2017). The event is not only a forum to discuss the latest issues, good practices and opportunities for the grassroots sport sector, its active format also leads by example with plenary sessions that get participants on their feet and speakers on fitness balls or exercise bikes, dynamic workshops, and a chance to do some urban orienteering in the host city. Expert speakers and facilitators from a range of sectors bring know-how and new perspectives to make the programme rich in ideas and experiences, and accessible to anyone with an interest in helping their communities become more active. Sign up to the ISCA newsletter for updates and registration information as it is announced. Official website: https://www.movecongress.com/ 
    Budapest to host MOVE Congress in October 2019
  • Creating Moving People – building blocks and angles of attack
    Comment by ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby. I have the opportunity to give presentations about sport participation in a variety of international and national contexts. All situations are different but one illustration is useful when trying to frame the common challenge. In settings where the aim is to promote physical activity and recreational sport – even though the cultural, political, social and economic situations may be different – we all have the same ‘building blocks’ at hand and some angles of attack. Well, not all building blocks are always at hand in the right size, but as a model for understanding it works.Basically, I see four main building blocks. That is: ‘Hardware’, ‘Software’, ‘Orgware’* and ‘Behaviour Design’. And roughly two ways to address the development and change, namely: ‘Top Down’ and ‘Bottom Up’. ‘Hardware’ is understood as facilities, equipment, gadgets; ‘Software’ primarily as the immaterial programmes, courses and human instruction, and motivation; ‘Orgware’ as the organisational setup that should govern, structure and support sport participation. Organisation can, from this perspective, be any type – private, public, non-profit, etc. And last the new kid on the block is ‘Behaviour Design’, which in this case is the right mix of ‘hardware’, ‘software’ and ‘orgware’ that can trigger and motivate human beings to act differently – in our case to become more physically active. With these building blocks we can ‘attack’ the challenge from either the ‘Top Down’ or ‘Bottom Up’.Top Down is understood as overall decisions and initiatives taken far away from the human beings/citizens that we would like to motivate to move more. That could be national or even international policies and actions plans, such as the ‘Australia Sport 2030’ plan with the aim that Australia should be the most sportive nation by 2030, or when the Mayor of Paris announces that Paris should be the best running city in the world. A Bottom Up approach is, on the other hand, where we address and enter into dialogues, planning phases, and so on directly with the citizens we would like to encourage to be more active. It is all about creating the right mix, at the right time to the right target groups. For example, the vision to make Paris the best running city in the world will probably take some ‘Hardware’ such as new infrastructure and adaptations of existing spaces for running. It will probably also take a lot of ‘Software’, ‘Orgware’ and Behaviour Design to influence the motivation and actions of runners. One of the latest examples of a Top Down initiative is the World Health Organisation’s new Global Action Plan on Physical Activity 2018-2030. It is a Top Down initiative composed of policy recommendations within four areas. Some of the suggested policies are directed at the ‘Hardware’, some aim at the ‘Software’ and ‘Behaviour Design’ – and for sure all of them need an amount of mobilisation of organisations and institutions to make the paper more than just a report. To Walk the Talk in other words! *The three elements of Hardware, Software and Orgware in a sport participation context are introduced by Remco Hoekman. I have added the new kid on the block ‘Behaviour Design’. Therefore, at this moment it is also suitable to refer to Remco Hoekman’s new book “Sport policy, sport facilities and sport participation” where he examines how sport policies at national and municipal levels in the Netherlands do influence sport participation. The book is hereby recommended.Comment originally published on LinkedIn 
    Creating Moving People – building blocks and angles of attack
ISCA Awards for MOVEment Spaces presented to winners in an array of colour and fun
The ISCA Awards ceremony wrapped up the programme with a colourful and – at times – unpredictable presentation of four awards recognising partnerships who have turned urban spaces into active spaces.  The winners, announced in October, were Fitness-Locations from DTB in Germany (green space – parks), Looking for a Place to Dream from GAME Lebanon (black space – asphalt or paved areas), and Bathing Zones from the City of Copenhagen, Culture and Leisure Department in Denmark (blue space – water), and the People’s Choice award went to Healthy Ireland: Healthy Cities and Counties, who created Swim Distance Markers in Galway Bay. Four Lego trophies designed by ISCA Youth Officer Alexander Appleyard Keeling were presented to Pia Pauly and Luli Gonzalez from DTB, Ida Brix from GAME, Mira Kirk Hedemann from the City of Copenhagen, and Fiona Donovan from Healthy Ireland: Healthy Cities and Counties, who all took part in the seminar and presented their partnerships' award-winning initiatives at the MOVEment Spaces closing meeting. ISCA’s Youth Officers also turned heads at the ceremony by delivering the awards by skateboard, in swimming trunks, in yoga tights, and in much-too-familiar David Hasselhoff-esque red boardshorts, before leading an impromptu ISCA-disco dance full of moves that epitomise “everyday” physical activity: from shovelling snow, to picking fruit to moving the lawn. Read more about the award winners Watch the full ceremony, including the ISCA-disco, on the ISCA Facebook page

You will like working with us!

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 7th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week took place on 28 May-3 June 2018 and MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil) took place on 23-30 September 2018. Stay tuned for the dates for 2019!

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New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you later in 2018. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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