ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • First glimpse of four new initiatives that will bring sport, non-sport and refugees together in collaboration
    The MOVE Beyond project’s sport and non-sport partnership pairs gave an inspiring overview of the pilot actions they will run in the coming months at the recent project meeting in Trento, Italy. They revealed that they have already secured support from municipalities, other humanitarian organisations, NGOs and friendship associations to carry out their activities. Here are some exclusive insights into four approaches that aim to MOVE Beyond common boundaries to including refugees in sport and community activities. DenmarkDGI and the Danish Red Cross are focusing their pilot action on one municipality and an initiative called “Friends Show the Way”, which pairs refugees with a Danish friend who will “show the way” to becoming a member of their local sport club. “We want to build a stronger bridge to activities that are already going on,” DGI Inclusion Consultant Siliane Bjerre said. She said that clubs often lack volunteers or individuals who have contact with the target group. “Often the social person is in need – not only to run the activities, but to make the refugee feel at home and want to come again.” As part of their pilot, DGI and the Danish Cross are mapping local actors who can work together to create an inclusive environment for refugees and asylum seekers. These include the Danish Refugee Council and the Somali-Danish and Syrian-Danish friendship groups. ItalyUISP Trento and ATAS are working together with the asylum centre ASD Intrecciante and local university students to create a multicultural football team and enter them into an amateur 11-a-side football league that will become an active example of social inclusion and in contrast to racism and intolerance. The league operates on the principle of providing a “third half” that gives opportunities to each player (be they an asylum seeker or not), to play a role in their association that goes beyond just the game (e.g. speaking in public, on the radio, helping with organising the matches). As the young men who live at the asylum centre usually live there for a year or more as their cases are being processed, the league offers year-round social activities that help introduce them to local community members. The MOVE Beyond project partners visited ASD Intrecciante in Trento to find out more about how their small team is making a big impact when it comes to welcoming asylum seekers and helping them settle into the community. SwedenIn planning their pilot project in Värnersborg, north of Gothenburg in Sweden, Save the Children and SISU noticed that refugees do not only arrive with a lack of knowledge of the local culture and sport culture, but the local sport culture also lacks the knowledge and experience of working with refugees. “We are reinforcing this point all the time,” Save the Children Domestic Programme Manager Sara Stigzelius said. “If you’ve never lived it, you don’t know how.” The partner pair are working with the art and cultural centre Restad Gård and StreetGames Gotherburg to help train refugees to become International Coordinators of Physical Activity. Part of the training will include how to seek funds to build on their work after the pilot. They will focus on four target groups to recruit the participants: strong women, a youth group, and a cricket and floorball club. In particular, the initiative will focus on supporting unaccompanied children who have turned 18 and need support in entering into employment. The emphasis is on empowering the refugees by giving them central roles in organising the activities. “It’s not a top-down initiative; you’re not a charity for refugees. You’re forming a partnership and bringing their knowledge to the fore,” Stigzelius said. UKStreetGames and the SPARC social enterprise are joining forces with the Devon and Cornwall Refugee Support Centre and Plymouth City Council to implement the Club1 readiness model that is a three-step model that starts from creating a safe house, to conducting group visits, to supporting the refugees in “going solo” and independently getting involved in community sport. But the first challenge is to convince local sport and leisure centres that physical activity and community sport offer a way of welcoming and enhancing the wellbeing of refugees. “At the moment we’re seeing that wellness activities are not priorities, they’re more seen as a ‘nice to have’,” StreetGames Project Coordinator Josh Saydraouten said. “With our pilot, we want to be confident that when we step away from this project, we know that we’ve left the participants in a good place. This is also about changing the attitudes of leisure centre staff to better accommodate the needs of the target group.” Keep up-to-date and learn moreMOVE Beyond is a two-year Erasmus+ Sport Collaborative project led by ISCA. Visit the Integration of Refugees Through Sport website to follow the progress of the project and access free resources that will support you in implementing programmes for and with refugees and asylum seekers.By Rachel Payne, ISCA
    First glimpse of four new initiatives that will bring sport, non-sport and refugees together in collaboration
  • MOVE Beyond partners start pilot actions on refugee inclusion through sport
    Community sport and non-sport organisations in four countries have now begun an 11-month trial of new initiatives that support the inclusion and integration of refugees though sport. DGI and the Danish Red Cross (Denmark), UISP Trento and ATAS (Italy), SISU and Save the Children Region West (Sweden) and StreetGames and SPARC (UK) will implement pilot actions at a local or national level that involved specific interventions designed by the partners in each country, assisted and supported by ISCA, the University of Copenhagen (Denmark) and Demos (Belgium). The pilots started this month and were presented at the second partner meeting hosted by ISCA member UISP in Trento. They will end in April 2020 and the results will be presented at an international conference in Brussels towards the end of 2020. The pilots are planned as small scale activities organised by two or more organisations and directly involving groups of refugees. The MOVE Beyond project is building on the groundwork done in ISCA’s Integration of Refugees Through Sport projects that were supported by NordPlus Adult and Erasmus+ KA2 Strategic Partnerships. These projects identified good practices and established an implementation framework (facilitated through an online course) that can be carried out by both sport and non-sport actors who are working with refugees in their communities. Creating a win-win-win situation by joining forcesMOVE Beyond partner Demos is currently conducting consultations with 18 stakeholders from both sport and non-sport organisations on the barriers faced when working in refugee inclusion programmes, and will soon launch a questionnaire to support the findings. Focus groups with refugees are also being organised in each partner country and all results will be used to develop policy recommendations and advocacy messages to encourage broader collaboration in inclusion initiatives. Demos Project Coordinator Zakayo Wandoloh gave an inspiring presentation of the initial findings in Trento, which highlighted that sport and play have great potential to foster the inclusion of refugees. “Sport and play are something that is very universal. Everyone understands what sport and play are, and they offer an easy way to break the ice and get into the conversation,” he said. However, he said elite sport is dominating media headlines and stories of refugees breaking through at the elite level are overshadowing the social benefits of participating at the grassroots level. “High profile refugees are raising expectations of sport as a pathway to the elite level, while clubs only offer grassroots sport. Success stories at the grassroots level, however, are less visible in the media. When I asked the stakeholders to give examples of success stories in grassroots inclusion of refugees they said, ‘Where do I start? There are so many!’ But we don’t see them.” The findings underlined that raising the profile of these actions and creating a sustainable impact can be done by bringing sport and non-sport actors together and by including refugees and asylum seekers in designing the activities. “By joining forces, you have expertise in both worlds (sport and non-sport). By engaging the refugees in organising the activities, you are fostering sustainable change due to the global outlook of the target group. It’s a win-win-win situation. Programmes for refugees are often created for them but without them. And although they have good intentions, they often have the wrong approaches. Talk to the target group before you enter into your (sport and non-sport) collaboration so you can anticipate the barriers and try to avoid them.” Click here for a closer look at the four pilot actions that are part of the Erasmus+ Sport Collaborative Partnership MOVE Beoynd. By Rachel Payne, ISCA
    MOVE Beyond partners start pilot actions on refugee inclusion through sport
  • ISCA contributes to Global Action Plan for healthy lives and well-being
    ISCA has today submitted its comments on the draft Global Action Plan for healthy lives and well-being, which is an initiative of twelve multilateral global health and development organisations to align efforts and more effectively deliver towards the Sustainable Development Goal number 3 on Good Health and Well-being. The World Health Organization has extended an open invitation on its website to governmental and non-governmental stakeholders to contribute to the draft, which will be presented during the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in September 2019. The Action Plan and consultation process were requested by world leaders Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo of Ghana, Prime Minister Erna Solberg of Norway with support from United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres. ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg comments that the draft’s emphasis on “strengthening collaboration among multilateral health organisations to accelerate country progress on the health-related Sustainable Development Goals” should especially encompass actors involved in promoting health-enhancing physical activity at a community level. “This global action plan is an opportunity for ISCA to underline the important role that civil society has in promoting health through grassroots sport and physical activity. ISCA’s diverse group of members are part of a movement of civil society-based and other entities that promote and deliver regular, cost-effective and tailored physical activities for citizens in their local communities. It is important to recognise this major contribution to global health and well-being, and to ensure adequate support for these organisations to deliver on citizens’ needs.” Read more and submit your contribution to the draft hereImage: World Health Organization
    ISCA contributes to Global Action Plan for healthy lives and well-being
  • Social inclusion of refugees can start with you and physical activity: Try our new Integration of Refugees Through Sport online course
    Today ISCA is celebrating World Refugee Day by launching a brand new online course available on learn.isca.org that is especially designed to support grassroots sport, physical education, social services and other community staff or volunteers in their professional development. If you are working with, or are considering working with, initiatives to support refugees settle into their new communities, the free course will equip you with inspiring – and often moving – first-hand insights from professionals in Scandinavia, Germany, Italy and the UK. The online course was designed together with partners of two projects supported by NordPlus Adult and the Erasmus+ programme on the Integration of Refugees Through Sport and captures essential learning points from their experience in working with this vulnerable target group. By completing four interconnected modules, you will learn:The refugee story: Understanding the target group and their situationsHow to start: What steps can you take to work with refugees through sport and physical activityIntercultural understanding: Learning more about cultural differences and sensitivities in working with this target groupPartnership and collaboration: Who can you approach for support or to work together on your initiatives? Individuals can be powerful change-makers, but it’s often easier and effective to work together. Start your journey towards positive changeDespite many political challenges that clubs, organisations, NGOs and even individuals working with refugees, immigrants, asylum seekers face in their daily work, we are optimistic and motivated to change things, slowly, but hopefully with everlasting results for an inclusive society of tomorrow. The main message that has recurred throughout the Integration of Refugees Through Sport project is that sport and simple physical movements can be used as a momentary relief for refugees and can open doors to new social contacts and different cultures. And that sport and physical activity are also simply about people wanting to #PlayTogether. “One of the most common issues for refugees is the growing existential crisis – not wanting to exist. Physical activity is something that provokes the feeling of actually wanting to be alive,” Morten Andersson from the Ollerup Academy of Physical Education in Denmark shares from his experience on the challenges and rewards of using physical activity to help refugees settle into their new communities. Gain more valuable experience in just a few clicks and start your online learning journey this World Refugee Day at learn.isca.orgThe Integration of Refugees Through Sport online learning course has been developed with support from the EU Erasmus+ programme and in collaboration with the following partners: International Sport and Culture Association (coordinator), Akershus Idrettskrets (Norway) UMFÍ (Iceland), Academy of Physical Education Ollerup (Denmark), SISU Västergötland (Sweden) German Gymnastics Federation (DTB, Germany), UISP (Italy), StreetGames (UK), and University of Kent (UK). Visit the official website for the initiative here 
    Social inclusion of refugees can start with you and physical activity: Try our new Integration of Refugees Through Sport online course
  • ISCA PART OF NEW INITIATIVE TO DEVELOP INCLUSIVE BEACH GAMES MODEL IN EUROPE
    ISCA is partnering in a new pilot of an inclusive beach games model that will be launched in Latvia and Portugal in the lead-up to this year’s European Week of Sport. The initiative, led by the Latvian Sports Federation Council, is an Erasmus+ Sport project is developing free resources that can be used to organise inclusive events on natural beaches or artificially formed beaches in urban environments and by rivers or lakes. The pilot editions of the BeActive Beach Games will be held Riga, Latvia, in August and in Portimao, Portugal, in September. Open calls for teams of families to participate will be announced in Latvia, Estonia, Portugal and Spain. ISCA and TAFISA are strategic partners of the project, which, in addition to the Latvian Sports Federation Council, includes the Estonian Beach Sports Federation, Lithuanian Union of Sports Federations, Portuguese Institute of Sports and Youth, Union of Sports Federations in Catalonia, Italian National Democratic Organisation of Social Action. Together the partners are developing a model for inclusive and accessible beach games, including a manual for games organisers. The aim of the project is to seek new ways of attracting people, regardless of age, health opportunities, physical fitness or skills, to engage in active lifestyle, by using the beach or foreshore as an attractive setting. The project is focusing on families with teenage children as a starting point, but the resources will be adaptable to diverse target groups. Latvian Sports Federation Council (LSFP) President Einars Fogelis highlights that one of the goals of developing the Beach Games is to expand the #BeActive movement by actively offering ideas for an accessible, inclusive and exciting type of physical activity in a new environment – various beaches in Europe. “The diversity we encounter in sport shows that, in order to be physically active every day, it does not require additional resources and with a little thought, it is possible to convert any surrounding environment into the playground. The BeActive Beach Games model will be based directly on these principles for the inclusion of the various groups of society – games available to everyone, rules that can be changed or re-invented according to players, their available options and capabilities, and from which the most important objective is to encourage us to be active, including being on the beach,” he says. ISCA Project Coordinator Laura-Maria Tiidla says the event also promotes the beach as an accessible setting for sport-for-all activities. “A large part of society does not associate themselves with images of professional athletes in glossy magazines in major sports organisations, so it is important to constantly encourage and embrace people to do simple and accessible physical activities or movements every day,” she says. “The BeActive Beach Games is one of these promotional steps - to show how to create the environment, preconditions and suggest how to be as active as possible on the beach – whether it is a natural beach in countries with coastlines or an artificially created beach in the centre of one of the European capitals." Free resources to be released in 2020A total of 3 materials will be developed through the project and will be launched at the closing conference in mid-2020: BeActive Beach Games Manual, which will be designed as a model for organising and adapting games in different contexts on any other natural or artificial beaches in Europe at national or international level. It will summarise the experience of games in Latvia and Portugal, and include guidelines, recommendations and best practices for planning, organising and promoting BeActive Beach Games, bringing together the necessary infrastructure and equipment and guidelines for attracting and engaging different participant groupsThe methodological materials for participating in games and activities on an individual basis on the beach will include, a short video of the various sports and physical activity opportunities on the beach, accompanied by a description of the type of sport concerned, its necessary equipment, rules, site conditions and performance model. The material will provide contact details for further necessary professional instructionsThe third, educational material on sport, health, social and ethical values, will provide explanations and guidelines on the inclusive aspects of sport activities, involving people from different social and economic groups of society For more information you can follow the project partners on social media with the hashtag #BeActiveAtBeach. The event website will be launched soon. 
    ISCA PART OF NEW INITIATIVE TO DEVELOP INCLUSIVE BEACH GAMES MODEL IN EUROPE
First glimpse of four new initiatives that will bring sport, non-sport and refugees together in collaboration
The MOVE Beyond project’s sport and non-sport partnership pairs gave an inspiring overview of the pilot actions they will run in the coming months at the recent project meeting in Trento, Italy. They revealed that they have already secured support from municipalities, other humanitarian organisations, NGOs and friendship associations to carry out their activities. Here are some exclusive insights into four approaches that aim to MOVE Beyond common boundaries to including refugees in sport and community activities. DenmarkDGI and the Danish Red Cross are focusing their pilot action on one municipality and an initiative called “Friends Show the Way”, which pairs refugees with a Danish friend who will “show the way” to becoming a member of their local sport club. “We want to build a stronger bridge to activities that are already going on,” DGI Inclusion Consultant Siliane Bjerre said. She said that clubs often lack volunteers or individuals who have contact with the target group. “Often the social person is in need – not only to run the activities, but to make the refugee feel at home and want to come again.” As part of their pilot, DGI and the Danish Cross are mapping local actors who can work together to create an inclusive environment for refugees and asylum seekers. These include the Danish Refugee Council and the Somali-Danish and Syrian-Danish friendship groups. ItalyUISP Trento and ATAS are working together with the asylum centre ASD Intrecciante and local university students to create a multicultural football team and enter them into an amateur 11-a-side football league that will become an active example of social inclusion and in contrast to racism and intolerance. The league operates on the principle of providing a “third half” that gives opportunities to each player (be they an asylum seeker or not), to play a role in their association that goes beyond just the game (e.g. speaking in public, on the radio, helping with organising the matches). As the young men who live at the asylum centre usually live there for a year or more as their cases are being processed, the league offers year-round social activities that help introduce them to local community members. The MOVE Beyond project partners visited ASD Intrecciante in Trento to find out more about how their small team is making a big impact when it comes to welcoming asylum seekers and helping them settle into the community. SwedenIn planning their pilot project in Värnersborg, north of Gothenburg in Sweden, Save the Children and SISU noticed that refugees do not only arrive with a lack of knowledge of the local culture and sport culture, but the local sport culture also lacks the knowledge and experience of working with refugees. “We are reinforcing this point all the time,” Save the Children Domestic Programme Manager Sara Stigzelius said. “If you’ve never lived it, you don’t know how.” The partner pair are working with the art and cultural centre Restad Gård and StreetGames Gotherburg to help train refugees to become International Coordinators of Physical Activity. Part of the training will include how to seek funds to build on their work after the pilot. They will focus on four target groups to recruit the participants: strong women, a youth group, and a cricket and floorball club. In particular, the initiative will focus on supporting unaccompanied children who have turned 18 and need support in entering into employment. The emphasis is on empowering the refugees by giving them central roles in organising the activities. “It’s not a top-down initiative; you’re not a charity for refugees. You’re forming a partnership and bringing their knowledge to the fore,” Stigzelius said. UKStreetGames and the SPARC social enterprise are joining forces with the Devon and Cornwall Refugee Support Centre and Plymouth City Council to implement the Club1 readiness model that is a three-step model that starts from creating a safe house, to conducting group visits, to supporting the refugees in “going solo” and independently getting involved in community sport. But the first challenge is to convince local sport and leisure centres that physical activity and community sport offer a way of welcoming and enhancing the wellbeing of refugees. “At the moment we’re seeing that wellness activities are not priorities, they’re more seen as a ‘nice to have’,” StreetGames Project Coordinator Josh Saydraouten said. “With our pilot, we want to be confident that when we step away from this project, we know that we’ve left the participants in a good place. This is also about changing the attitudes of leisure centre staff to better accommodate the needs of the target group.” Keep up-to-date and learn moreMOVE Beyond is a two-year Erasmus+ Sport Collaborative project led by ISCA. Visit the Integration of Refugees Through Sport website to follow the progress of the project and access free resources that will support you in implementing programmes for and with refugees and asylum seekers.By Rachel Payne, ISCA

You will like working with us!

Read more »
 

The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

Read more »
 
 

The 8th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week will happen on 27 May-2 June 2019 and MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil) is set to place on 23-30 September 2019. Follow the links to register as a MOVE Agent in your country.

Read more »

New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you later in 2019. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

Read more »

OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

Read more »

MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

Read more »