ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • Nordic walking a surprise hit in sunny Barcelona
    The Mediterranean streets of the Catalan capital would not be the first place that came to mind when someone begins to talk about Nordic walking. However, thanks to an initiative born out of the MOVEment Spaces project’s local experimentations, this low-impact, healthy way of being active (created in the heart of Finland) has been transferred seamlessly to Spain! MOVEment Spaces partners UBAE and the City of Barcelona started the project to help introduce an easily accessible physical activity to hard-to-reach populations, targeting three of the most deprived areas of Barcelona. The secondary aims were to encourage health professionals to actively prescribe physical activity more often, and to promote exercising in public sports centres and urban locations. The first step was to create a network that enabled the project to engage the target group. This was done by partnering with local primary health care centres, sport organisations and sport centres, alongside Municipalities and Health Agencies. The focus was on people aged over 50 who were physically inactive and at risk of developing non-communicable diseases or making their conditions worse. Doctors at primary health care centres – after being trained in relaying the benefits of physical activity to their patients – prescribed physical activity to individuals with different pathologies such as high blood-pressure, obesity and diabetes. The three different groups of participants were prescribed Nordic walking in a group once a week for 60 minutes, being led by a specialist instructor. Through this strong partnership between the health centres and sports organisations, 81 of the 120 participants across the three groups were evaluated in regards to the impact of the activity to show both how effective the activity was and to examine whether it would be sustainable across a wider segment of the population. The project found that while the average age of those involved was close to 70, the programme showed that the participants still discovered new and accessible places to be active, such as the beach or local hillside, and also were made more aware of the local public sports centres available to them. Having an expert instructor working with them was well received, and the groups worked well together. The positive atmosphere and the friendships they made encouraged the participants to continue the programme after the MOVEment Spaces pilot. Of the 120 people who started the programme 101 finished it (over 80%), and half of those who completed the programme were there for every single one of the sessions. To be even more effective going forward there is intention to, from the results of the pilot, increase the amount of time spent on the sessions, in addition to varying the intensity of the activity. The programme was such a success that the City of Barcelona is considering keeping it running for 2019… and hopefully more cities around Spain get on-board to get people moving for their health! By Alexander Appleyard-Keeling, ISCA
    Nordic walking a surprise hit in sunny Barcelona
  • MOVING Beyond research to implementation of sports activities that include refugees in their new communities
    Photo: First study tour for the MOVE Beyond project partners at Trampoline House in Copenhagen.  This month, ISCA and our project partners from 5 countries have started a brand new project that will “MOVE Beyond” the practical research done in our Integration of Refugees through Sport projects to testing initiatives in different European countries. MOVE Beyond is a two-year project supported by the EU’s Erasmus+ Sport Collaborative Partnerships, which aims to enhance cross-sector collaboration on grassroots sport and physical activities for societal inclusion of refugees by enabling stronger involvement of non-sport actors. The partners include the University of Copenhagen’s Advanced Migration Studies and Belgian organisation Demos, who specialise in research and analysis of best practices in inclusion of refugees and migrants, plus four “implementation pairs” that will work on small scale pilot implementation projects in four of the countries. These include DGI and the Danish Red Cross (Denmark), UISP Trentino and ATAS (Italy), Västra Götalands Idrottsförbund and Save the Children Sweden (Region West) (Sweden), and StreetGames and SPARC Sport (UK). In creating these cross-sector partnerships, the partners are aiming to show how to approach and overcome common barriers that prevent asylum seekers and refugees from getting involved in community sport or other activities offered in their communities. As part of the pilot project preparation, the partners will consult other organisations working with refugees and speak to refugees and/or asylum seekers who are part of existing programmes to gain valuable insights before commencing the pilot implementations. Inclusion is a community-wide effortBeatrice Agostini from UISP Trentino underlines the importance of consulting people delivering projects, people from the community and the refugees themselves, in order to take a starting point in inclusion rather than developing specific or separate activities for the target group. “The biggest challenge is to integrate refugees and asylum seekers in sport without creating activities directed only to them. This creates another form of isolation from the rest of the society. The real challenge is to include locals in the activities with refugees. Zakayo Wandoloh from Demos agrees that creating opportunities for inclusion through sport can be a warmer gesture from a community to the refugees, which can ultimately have a greater impact on the community as a whole, than formal programmes focusing primarily on integration upon arrival. “The distinction between merely allowing people into a community and welcoming them to such an extent that the community changes is worth emphasising,” he says. “This approach reflects a number of international statements and is essential to human dignity, to the enjoyment of sports and exercising of human rights. Inclusion also emphasises a sense of belonging, which includes feeling respected, valued for who you are, feeling a level of supportive energy and commitment from others.” Sport and play can both heal and open new doorsDGI is already working with local sport clubs to train coaches to introduce sport and play to language schools and asylum centres, and believes that specialised programmes in these early stages are also very important.“Many refugee children have never experienced the freedom of care, sports and play,” Peter Bennett, the Head of Inclusion in the DGI North Zealand region says. “Some have simply forgotten what it’s like to be a child. Camps and training sessions with their peers can help heal the emotional scars and create a relatively normal happening in their troublesome life as a refugee. And at the same time it gives them a way into being part of the Danish society with other children.” A new opportunity to make a differenceThe MOVE Beyond project presents an exciting new beginning for SPARC Sport, and an opportunity to become a frontrunner in this field of work in the English county of Cornwall. It is an opportunity not to be missed, and one that will help make a difference to the community SPARC Sport’s Director Jamie Tresidder says. “This project will enable us to test various methods of working with refugees and we will be the only organisation in the South West of England engaging with refugees directly with sport. It will enable us to build genuine and meaningful relationships with the refugee community to understand their interests and barriers as well as with community based sport/leisure organisations to help overcome them to bring about genuine inclusion and integration,” he says. It will be a demanding two years for the project partners to bring their ideas to life, but in the process they will be working rewards that are set to not only enrich their work and their partnerships, but ultimately enrich their communities and the lives of some of their newest community members. The MOVE Beyond project is co-funded by the European Commission under the Erasmus+ Collaborative Partnerships in Sport programme.By Rachel Payne, ISCA 
    MOVING Beyond research to implementation of sports activities that include refugees in their new communities
  • Hot off the press: ISCA Annual Report 2018
    ISCA's Annual Report for 2018 is now available and is a bumper edition with 40 pages featuring the projects, campaigns and advocacy efforts that made the year an impactful one for ISCA, our members and partners. The report does not only look back, but also ahead with a preview of what's in store for 2019. "A decade of raising awareness and gaining attention from various sectors about the human and financial cost of inactivity did culminate in 2018," ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby writes in the introduction to the report, giving The Lancet's global score for physical activity a closer look as we embark on a new year in 2019. You can browse the report below, and please contact the ISCA Secretariat at info@isca-web.org if you would like us to send you a hard copy. 
    Hot off the press: ISCA Annual Report 2018
  • Plovdiv’s Pop-up Parks get thousands active
    Last week we presented the NGO-city partnership that piloted a MOVEment Spaces “green space” initiative in Wroclaw, Poland. This week, we zoom in on the ancient city of Plovdiv and MOVEment Spaces partners BG Be Active and Plovdiv Municipality, who engaged several clubs in their Pop-up Parks initiative through their Department of Sport. The partners embarked on the project with a range of interconnected goals. The municipality aimed for citizens to reconsider the importance of sport, motivate more young people to be physically active, and to promote volunteering in sporting events as a tool for developing a sense of responsibility and self-awareness. BG Be Active wanted to use innovative methods, including elements of the Placemaking approach, to engage people in using public areas as MOVEment Spaces, and therefore be more physically active. Additionally they wished to promote the results of their initiative as a good example of an intervention in an urban space to promote active lifestyles, in order to motivate others to also follow their lead. During the European Week of Sport “Pop-up Parks” were placed in two different spots, at the Youth Centre sport complex and also at the City Garden. The events involved an outdoor sport tournament, demonstrations by multiple sport clubs, and activities specifically targeting disadvantaged populations. In order to engage vulnerable and disadvantaged young people, who previously - for the most part - had a lack of motivation for such communal events, famous professional sports people were engaged, who were involved in motivational meetings where they shared their stories. During sport demonstrations several prominent Olympians also got involved. The success of the implementation was shown by the fact that over 3000 people got involved, with almost 2000 of those being aged 18 and under. More than half of those involved were female, and almost 200 disabled people took part. But that was not the only success, informational campaigns enhanced the visibility of local sport on a myriad of levels, a group of 15 young people developed their skill-sets by being involved in the organisation of the event, alongside getting 30 young people from vulnerable groups involved in sports initiatives. The collaboration between BG Be Active and the Municipality will continue after the project, with activities such as the Day of Sport in May, and Sport Week in September, set to take place again to ensure people continue to be active outdoors! Vlad Fedorov of BG Be Active is convinced that the project, “has motivated participants to practice physical activity in a non-conventional way.” And also noted that, “People were very eloquent in their feedback and expressed their hopes for the initiative to continue on a permanent basis. Complemented with sunny weather, open air and nature, ‘Pop-Up Park’ has given people a new template for staying active without the need to attend the gym or any other sport facility with entrance fees.” By Alexander Appleyard-Keeling, ISCA
    Plovdiv’s Pop-up Parks get thousands active
  • MOVE Congress 2019 Change the Game: It’s your MOVE
    The 9th MOVE Congress is set to unearth the next game-changers for grassroots sport and physical activity promotion. Are you one of them? Get ready to join us in Budapest, Hungary, on 16-18 October 2019 for one of the world’s biggest conferences dedicated to grassroots sport and physical activity. If you’ve already experienced a taste of the MOVE Congress in Copenhagen, Frankfurt, Paris, Sao Paulo, Barcelona, Rome or Birmingham, you won’t want to miss the next edition, which promises to be the most interactive yet.Get into the game: Why you shouldn’t miss the MOVE Congress 2019The MOVE Congress opens the door for grassroots sport and physical activity promoters to network with 500 likeminded professionals from around the globe, including health experts, decision-makers, companies, urban planners, academics and inspiring individuals who are finding innovative ways to MOVE people. Get into the game by meeting speakers from across the world who are shaking up the grassroots sport and physical activity sector with effective campaigns, approaches, technologies and an extraordinary motivation to defuse the inactivity timebomb. Join us to discover: How placemaking and technology are transforming the ways we choose to be activeHow action plans, campaigns and cross-sector initiatives are joining the dots between physical activity and healthHow gamification and innovative approaches to physical education and physical activity are getting more children movingHow grassroots sport initiatives are paving the way for diplomacy within and across bordersHow you can build a case for funding from public, corporate and foundation sourcesHow you will approach your next essential partner after you spot them in the auditorium! What’s your next MOVE?Get ready to book your seat for the MOVE Congress 2019 when we open the registration in March 2019. Keep up-to-date with the latest news on the Congress topics and speakers on the official website and by signing up for the ISCA newsletter. https://www.movecongress.com/
    MOVE Congress 2019 Change the Game: It’s your MOVE
Nordic walking a surprise hit in sunny Barcelona
The Mediterranean streets of the Catalan capital would not be the first place that came to mind when someone begins to talk about Nordic walking. However, thanks to an initiative born out of the MOVEment Spaces project’s local experimentations, this low-impact, healthy way of being active (created in the heart of Finland) has been transferred seamlessly to Spain! MOVEment Spaces partners UBAE and the City of Barcelona started the project to help introduce an easily accessible physical activity to hard-to-reach populations, targeting three of the most deprived areas of Barcelona. The secondary aims were to encourage health professionals to actively prescribe physical activity more often, and to promote exercising in public sports centres and urban locations. The first step was to create a network that enabled the project to engage the target group. This was done by partnering with local primary health care centres, sport organisations and sport centres, alongside Municipalities and Health Agencies. The focus was on people aged over 50 who were physically inactive and at risk of developing non-communicable diseases or making their conditions worse. Doctors at primary health care centres – after being trained in relaying the benefits of physical activity to their patients – prescribed physical activity to individuals with different pathologies such as high blood-pressure, obesity and diabetes. The three different groups of participants were prescribed Nordic walking in a group once a week for 60 minutes, being led by a specialist instructor. Through this strong partnership between the health centres and sports organisations, 81 of the 120 participants across the three groups were evaluated in regards to the impact of the activity to show both how effective the activity was and to examine whether it would be sustainable across a wider segment of the population. The project found that while the average age of those involved was close to 70, the programme showed that the participants still discovered new and accessible places to be active, such as the beach or local hillside, and also were made more aware of the local public sports centres available to them. Having an expert instructor working with them was well received, and the groups worked well together. The positive atmosphere and the friendships they made encouraged the participants to continue the programme after the MOVEment Spaces pilot. Of the 120 people who started the programme 101 finished it (over 80%), and half of those who completed the programme were there for every single one of the sessions. To be even more effective going forward there is intention to, from the results of the pilot, increase the amount of time spent on the sessions, in addition to varying the intensity of the activity. The programme was such a success that the City of Barcelona is considering keeping it running for 2019… and hopefully more cities around Spain get on-board to get people moving for their health! By Alexander Appleyard-Keeling, ISCA

You will like working with us!

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 8th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week will happen on 27 May-2 June 2019 and MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil) is set to place on 23-30 September 2019. Follow the links to register as a MOVE Agent in your country.

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New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you later in 2019. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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