ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • ISCA open call for grassroots sport leaders for Europe-China exchanges
    Are you working in grassroots sport and physical activity in a European country? Would you like to broaden your horizon, gain valuable insights from other countries, and build your international network? Now is the chance to apply for ISCA’s Europe-China exchange programme and join exciting visits to China and Hungary! Send us your expression of interest by 15 May 2019. Countries eligible for this call are the Programme Countries of the EU Erasmus+ Programme, namely the 28 EU Member States, plus former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein, Turkey and Serbia. Please click here or download the document below for more information. Photo front page: leniners/FlickrPhoto top: Cocoabiscuit/Flickr
    ISCA open call for grassroots sport leaders for Europe-China exchanges
  • ISCA and WHO Europe join forces to bring European Immunization Week and No Elevators Day together
    ISCA and the WHO Regional Office for Europe are joining forces again to promote European Immunization Week and No Elevators Day by turning UN City in Copenhagen into an interactive learning and activity zone on Wednesday 24 April. The fun event is to celebrate small steps for disease prevention, which can make a big difference in protecting your health and well-being, in line with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal 3. Many surprises are being prepared for the day, the main activity being an exciting treasure hunt where participants can learn more about immunization and health while being physically active and winning fantastic prizes. There will also be a breathtaking parkour demonstration at the lobby at 12:00 and 13:00. Both events focus on the small steps people can take to improve their health through prevention. 24 April is the first day of European Immunization Week (EIW), a campaign which works to ensure that every one receives the vaccines they deserve in order to create a future free from vaccine-preventable diseases. At the same time, No Elevators Day is a free and global initiative to raise awareness and promote the benefits of incorporating physical activity into your everyday life, by promoting the use of the stairs instead of the elevator. #VaccinesWork #TakeTheStairs  
    ISCA and WHO Europe join forces to bring European Immunization Week and No Elevators Day together
  • Over 30 countries participating in No Elevators Day 2019
    Wednesday 24 April will mark the 5th edition of No Elevators Day, a free global initiative aimed to add more physical activity into a busy schedule. This year, organisations from more than 30 countries across 5 continents will come together to promote a healthier lifestyle by encouraging their employees and visitors to choose a staircase over an elevator or an escalator. No Elevators Day will take place in schools in Spain and educate students about various benefits of stair-climbing, such as reducing stress and saving time. 33 activities will be arranged in Brazil through 15 Sesc centres and a national event in São Paulo. The Municipality of Palmira in Colombia is organising a No Elevators Day where citizens can learn more about physical activity as well as ways to be active on and off the stairs. The event will also take place in the BRR Towers business centre in downtown Karachi, Pakistan and many more cities in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. With one week left to go, there is still time to join the worldwide movement by registering your No Elevators Day activity for free and creating healthier habits among the members of your community. Office buildings, towers, universities and all organisations as well as individuals are welcome to join the initiative by sealing off elevators or escalators and encouraging passers-by to #BeActive and #TakeTheStairs. Full list of registered events around the world is available here. By Marie Oleinik, ISCA 
    Over 30 countries participating in No Elevators Day 2019
  • No elephants in the room? Biases on corporate partnerships
    Comment by ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg.  “Fast food companies should not be associated with grassroots sport!” This is an argument that I hear quite often, if there is a discussion on the role of corporate partnerships in the grassroots sport sector. The same can be heard of alcohol, tobacco, and sugary beverages. This week at the EU Sport Forum, a major gathering of EU sport political stakeholders, we also heard the same argument when it comes to illegal betting companies. The argument was made by Hansjörg Höltkemeier, President of European Lotteries, in the session on “Why and how should grassroots sport be financed?”. The reason Hansjörg put forward was that illegal betting operators limit the public income of state-owned, state-controlled or state-taxed betting agents, and therefore the income for grassroots sport which receive the bulk of lottery revenues. (In fact, the argument might as well have been made for health reasons, as evidence is now growing that gambling addiction is a serious health threat. But that argument would not be very helpful for the future of controlled sport betting, obviously.) But this one mention of corporate sponsorship during the Forum was the only time the topic was brought up in the debate. And that is puzzling. The study on “The funding of grassroots sport in the EU”, commissioned by the EU and published in 2013, showed that sport organisations expect the income from sponsorship to no less than double in the near future. No other income stream is expected to grow at that rate. So why was the topic of corporate sponsorship not addressed in a session dedicated to the theme of future funding for grassroots sport? I would speculate that this is because there is a bit of a bias among the EU Sport Forum organisers and audience. This is a public sector (EU) organised event. The audience is to a very high degree non-profit or public sector representatives. And obviously, public funding IS the biggest external contributor to grassroots sport funding today, as the above study also shows. Everyone in the room (me included) would like it to remain that way, given the societal benefits of grassroots sport. There may also be a bit of anxiousness about the topic of corporate partnerships. As the above quote and examples show, the debate very often gets quite heated and difficult, as it points to some real, ethical dilemmas. But it may not be wise to turn a blind eye to this debate if we want to make progress. Finally, I think the debate was maybe not taken for the simple reason that we don’t quite know what to make of it. Yes, there are potential ethical dilemmas. And yes, there is an identified need for further income streams for grassroots sport. But there may NOT be quite enough evidence, good examples and guidance on the partnerships between corporate partners and grassroots sport organisations to actually have an informed debate about it. It will too easily become another polarised debate with strong opponents of unhealthy sponsorships on the one side, and some more moderate viewpoints on broader partnerships on the other. I would conclude that private sponsorship may have been the “elephant in the room”. One of the problems was that the elephant – in the form of corporate partners for grassroots sport – was not even present (or probably even invited) into the room in the first place. I think that is a pity. I find that there is very little transparency on these partnerships. And there is little information available about what the partnerships involve practically and financially, as well as the critical success factors and the main problems encountered. This may partly be due to the fact that the organisations involved (on both sides) consider the partnerships to be a space of competitive interest and therefore share very limited information on their approaches, successes and financial implications. Equally, when failure or challenges occur, it is obviously not easy to share that information, especially in a field where there are also many ethically-oriented opponents to partnerships as described – failures can lead to enhancing the criticism of the partnerships in the first place. I would argue that we do not have enough focus on this area. We claim that cross-sector collaboration is the key to the future promotion of grassroots sport. Yet we do very little to understand yet alone support collaboration with the corporate sector. And this may well mean that important opportunities are lost. Not just for financing, but for partnerships that are building on mutual strengths, and that are important for the wider promotion of grassroots sport and physical activity. Why don’t we look more into these partnerships? Why don’t we establish a more informed debate? I am not saying that corporate partnerships are necessarily good. Neither am I saying they are bad by definition. But we need more information, examples and guidance to help evolve our sector and its mission. Is there a role to play on the European level? I think so! I would suggest that we look at the example from Canada, where ParticipAction established a “Partnership Protocol” to give this exact guidance to the grassroots sport sector. We should come together, build on that core good governance value of transparency, explore corporate partnerships and offer advice on how to tackle the dilemmas and opportunities. Let’s establish a European Partnership Protocol. The elephant in the room needs addressing. Photo: Laura-Maria Tiidla, ISCA
    No elephants in the room? Biases on corporate partnerships
  • “I eat stairs for breakfast”: Bulgaria aims for 500,000 No Elevators Day participants
    On Wednesday 24 April the BG Be Active team will encourage Bulgarians to choose the stairs instead of elevators to demonstrate how easy it is to be active in our daily lives. And this year, No Elevators Day in Bulgaria is being supported by the Bulgarian Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Youth and Sports. And that’s just the beginning – Bulgaria’s NowWeMOVE National Coordinator, Bilyana Mileva from BG Be Active (pictured second from left), shares how her NGO is gathering support for No Elevators Day from across the nation. Several big companies have also expressed their interest the initiative and are ready to motivate their employees to move on the day and start a new healthy daily habit. BG Be Active has also engaged some of the largest companies in Bulgaria, with a huge number of employees, such as NN Bulgaria, Telus, Vivacom, Progress, and Doverie. For instance, NN Bulgaria has more than 15,000 employees alone, аt Vivacom’s facilities there are over 2,000 employees, Telus (pictured below, taking part in No Elevators Day 2018) has more than 2,800 workers and Progress more than 500. The main goal we have set for 2019 is to motivate 500,000 community members to choose the stairs. One month before the event we had already received confirmations from event organisers in Plovdiv, Sofia, Varna, Silistra, Shumen, Stara Zagora, Burgas, Vidin, Smolyan, Montana and many others, who have who have registered the events planned in their local communities on the No Elevators Day website.Brand new resources for Bulgarian event organisersBG Be Active’s website has been updated with new information, including a “Resources” section with brand new promotional materials that are ready to download. We also invite our MOVE Agents and partners to join our Facebook event where we share updates and information. We are creating a video invitation for joining No Elevators Day, and we will put it on social media to engage more people to take the stairs. To create excitement in the lead-up to the event, we have announced a challenge inviting people to film a creative video using the stairs and sharr it with the hashtags #Noelevatorsday and #Ямстълбизазакуска (#Ieatstairsforbreakfast). Once more, the Bulgarian media have also responded positively to the campaign so we expect broad media coverage across the country. Find out more about No Elevators Day and how you can get involved
    “I eat stairs for breakfast”: Bulgaria aims for 500,000 No Elevators Day participants
ISCA open call for grassroots sport leaders for Europe-China exchanges
Are you working in grassroots sport and physical activity in a European country? Would you like to broaden your horizon, gain valuable insights from other countries, and build your international network? Now is the chance to apply for ISCA’s Europe-China exchange programme and join exciting visits to China and Hungary! Send us your expression of interest by 15 May 2019. Countries eligible for this call are the Programme Countries of the EU Erasmus+ Programme, namely the 28 EU Member States, plus former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein, Turkey and Serbia. Please click here or download the document below for more information. Photo front page: leniners/FlickrPhoto top: Cocoabiscuit/Flickr

You will like working with us!

Read more »
 

Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

Read more »
 

The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

Read more »
 
 

The 8th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week will happen on 27 May-2 June 2019 and MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil) is set to place on 23-30 September 2019. Follow the links to register as a MOVE Agent in your country.

Read more »

New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you later in 2019. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

Read more »

OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

Read more »

MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

Read more »