ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • Why continuity and innovation are equally important to sports clubs: Comment by ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby
    Graphic by UISP.  Last weekend I met a 70-year-old. Not a 70-year-old person, but rather a well-known member of ISCA. I joined our Italian member organisation UISP in celebrating its 70th anniversary with a seminar on advocacy for physical activity. 70 years is quite some time and we can congratulate UISP and other organisations for being able to be a relevant civil society organisation for several decades. Well done! Sport organisations both at the club level and umbrella organisation level have different histories across the globe. Some of the oldest – still existing – sport clubs are German clubs with more than 200 years of history, and Czech Sokol Organisation has over 150 years. It is quite amazing that a voluntary based civil society organisation like a sport club with few hundreds or a few thousands of members can exist for so long. That is important continuity. On the other hand, the clubs-based sport sector also depends on the development and creation of new clubs with new aims and priorities. The creation of new clubs is important for at least two reasons: First, some clubs close/stop existing so new clubs are needed. Second, sometimes development and innovation is easier by starting a new initiative or founding new clubs than changing existing ones. Assisting in the creation of new clubs and other organisations that can provide relevant activities to citizens is therefore one important task in giving citizens better access to physical activity. The diagram below is from Germany. It shows the founding year of the existing 90,000 sport clubs in Germany. (Gründungsjahr = Founding year). The data are from 2014 and show that more than 20,000 clubs (23.3%), in this case in Germany, have been founded after 1990. And it is an ongoing process. For a national sport organisation with clubs as members, the ratio of new clubs founded is an import key figure. It indicates some of the innovative dynamics. With this I wish you a good week – no matter if it will be taking part in a young club or a 70+ year-old one – as long as they are relevant. News: UISP turns 70 (in Italian)
    Why continuity and innovation are equally important to sports clubs: Comment by ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby
  • No Elevators Day ambassador challenges limitations of disability
    Photo: Albanian Paralympic champion Haki Doku shows us how he celebrated No Elevators Day this year. The increased international visibility of this year’s No Elevators Day, on 25 April, means that more people are aware of the core message the event hopes to promote, that simple, small lifestyle changes to your everyday routine can make a big difference to your activity levels, and in turn your health. With more people than ever hearing about No Elevators Day it also means that we at ISCA have naturally received more questions about the event than ever before! One of the most common questions encountered related to disability, and how it can be accommodated into the ethos of No Elevators Day. The answer is simple, in that while the event uses the powerful, visible message of “closing” elevators and escalators to show people that such relatively small changes to our daily routines can make big differences, it is outlined that “All activities under the No Elevators Day title are voluntary and should take into consideration accessibility requirements for people with disabilities and medical conditions,” as we understand that for some people, elevators and escalators are a necessity to be able to go about their daily lives. However, around the world there are numerous people challenging the general perceptions and limitations of “disability”. Just last month for Limb Loss Awareness month, double amputee Mandy Horvath climbed the 8590ft, 2744 step Pikes Peak in Manatou Springs, Colorado. Albanian Paralympic athlete Haki Doku travels the world descending and ascending stairs in his wheelchair, and holds the World Record for most stairs descended in a wheelchair within an hour, with 2404. As an ambassador of No Elevators Day in 2018, he shared his photos with us, which you can see above. Furthermore, advancements in prosthetics have meant that a far greater range of movements can now be carried out, as proven by Boston marathon bomb survivor Roseann Sdoia, who last year completed the 1576-step “Empire State Building Run-up”, to the top of the New York landmark. Awareness is the key word. Whether you can climb zero steps or 1000, No Elevators Day is simply about showing as many people as possible from across society that getting active and healthier does not require drastic changes, and can be accommodated within people’s busy daily lives. It might be that avoiding using elevators or escalators is not an option for any number of reasons day-to-day, be that due to disability, a lack of stairs, or simply that you live on the 20th floor, which is an unappealing climb after a long, hard day! But there are numerous other ways to be more active on a daily basis, and finding the way that works best for you is the most important thing! Save the date for next year’s No Elevators Day: Wednesday 24 April http://no-elevators-day.nowwemove.com/ By Alexander Appleyard-Keeling, ISCAPhotos courtesy of Haki Doku 
    No Elevators Day ambassador challenges limitations of disability
  • Raise your voice about the Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity this month: Comment by ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby
    Within the next month Health Ministers from close to 200 countries will – in the framework of the World Health Organisation (WHO) – adopt the Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity (GAPPA). That is at least what we foresee and, of course, hope. The WHO’s GAPPA is expected to be adopted during the World Health Assembly from 21-26 May 2018 in Geneva, Switzerland and the latest draft is published here. The provisional agenda of the upcoming meeting is here.I believe that this is a milestone – and a stepping stone to bring the promotion of physical activity higher on the agenda. In other words, to bring physical activity as high on the agenda as it deserves in relation to the well documented knowledge about its many positive social, mental and physical health effects. There is unfortunately still some way to go. To support the process from now until adoption - and not least to remind ourselves that this Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity should not only be adopted, but also be implemented, ISCA will carry out a social media campaign over the next month supporting the Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity. This goes hand-in-hand with our philosophy of the Human Right to MOVE as we call upon ‘The duty bearers’ (public authorities), ‘The moral duty bearers’ (civil society, private organisations) to give ‘the right holder’ (citizens) to enable everyone to enjoy their right to MOVE and enjoy and active, healthy lifestyle. So we’re calling on our members and partners to raise your voice and join our advocacy campaign on the WHO Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity. We you to use your social channels to put attention on the adoption and, not least, the suggested actions in the GAPPA. BUT besides pushing the message on social media, this campaign also gives you an opportunity to gently push your ministries and minsters not only to sign but to act. We hope that many of our members will use the occasion of the campaign and adoption to have a dialogue with public authorities/ministries on how to implement the good ideas in the action plan. With this I wish you a good kick-off to the ISCA social media campaign to support the Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity. You can support the campaign by adding the hashtags #GAPPA #ActiveVoice to your social media messages.Tag ISCA on Twitter: @ISCA_Tweet 
    Raise your voice about the Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity this month: Comment by ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby
  • 20 European Parliament representatives supported No Elevators Day
    ISCA’s No Elevators Day on 25 April not only expanded to three more continents this year, but also gathered support from double the number of members of European Parliament as last year, plus the European Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, Vytenis Andriukaitis. Our team visited the European Parliament in Brussels on 24-26 April to speak to MEPs from across the political spectrum about physical activity and find out more about the parliament’s new Stairs to Health (Take the First Step – Use the Stairs) campaign, led by Slovakian MEP Vladimir Manka, S&D. Mr. Manka expressed his support for No Elevators Day and the NowWeMOVE campaign and said he is confident that the European Parliament and ISCA’s combined efforts are making a different at the EU government level. “I believe that with your help and with the help of your activities, because they are really compatible, we have a common goal, and we will be able to make the whole of Europe move and bring positive impact not only on the EU institutions’ employees,” he said. “Your campaign is brilliant because of the variety of its activities and No Elevators Day is one of them. The global approach allows you to grab the attention of a large number people and bring them on board which is fantastic.” The Use the Stairs campaign was launched in February in the European Parliament and, like No Elevators Day, is also expanding quickly to other EU offices. “We started our campaign as a pilot project in the EU Parliament in Brussels and we have already been approached by other EU Institutions – for example, in Luxembourg – with a request to take part in what we’re doing here in Brussels.” Irish MEP Sean Kelly from EPP, who has supported No Elevators Day since the first event in 2015, also said he had seen an impact of these stair-climbing campaigns on staff in the parliament. “Actually I’ve noticed since the campaign started here more people are using the stairs so sometimes it becomes blocked because there is a traffic jam, step back and let others come down – ladies first, of course,” he said. ISCA interviewed the MEPs on camera on a range of topics, including No Elevators Day, the NowWeMOVE campaign and physical activity in general, and we discovered their perspectives on grassroots sport diplomacy, the Human Right to MOVE, the status of physical activity in their countries and their favourite ways to stay active. Then it was time for some action! Each MEP had a choice of physical activities to do, and football was arguably the most popular choice, followed by badminton, frisbee, skipping and table tennis. Some MEPs even decided to think outside the box! Seán Kelly passed around a ball Gaelic Football style, while Bogdan Wenta unsurprisingly opted to throw the ball up a flight of stairs, handball style. The MEPs also climbed a flight or two of stairs in celebration of No Elevators Day and to get their pulses up before a week of long meetings. Many thanks to all of the MEPs and staff we met at the European Parliament in Brussels who helped to spread the word about No Elevators Day and get more people moving! Stay tuned for exclusive footage from No Elevators Day in Parliament - videos coming soon! What do so many MEPs support No Elevators Day? Miroslav Mikolasik, MEP EPP, Slovakia“No Elevators Day is a very smart idea and I am supporting not only as a member of European Parliament but as a medical doctor. Being in the European Parliament as a politician I think it is a fantastic idea, very smart, and it is inviting members and also all kinds of bureaucrats in the European Parliament to move and not to sit every time but to burn calories and to do something for their health.”Rory Palmer, MEP S&D, UK“I think it’s something I’d like to see more workplaces and more office building and public buildings adopt. It’s often the easy choice is to get in the lift on the way to your office. Taking the stairs is a great way to get more physical activity. It’s good for health, good for wellbeing so I think it’s a great idea and I hope lots of people get behind it.” Emma McClarkin, MEP ECR, UK“NowWeMOVE and No Elevators Day is a brilliant example of what we can do to try to make people think a little differently about putting activity into their day-to-day lives.” Jeroen Lenaers, MEP EPP, Netherlands“Just to take the stairs instead of the elevator once or twice a day really helps to keep a little bit fit. I mean if I look at myself, a year ago I was 123kg and I’ve lost 30 kilos in the last 9 months and one of the things I do indeed is instead of taking the elevators take the stairs once, twice a day, and it just helps. It really makes you feel fitter.”Watch Jeoren’s own No Elevators Day video here Andrey Kovatchev, MEP EPP, Bulgaria“This is a very good idea to motivate our colleagues but also the staff of the European Parliament to use the stairs because some people say, and they’re right, that sitting is the new smoking.” Eduard Kukan, MEP EPP, Slovakia“Especially for us, members of the European Parliament, we are sitting such a long time, you know, so for us movement is very important to keep fit. So this is really the place where it is necessary to promote this kind of movement. We really need it.” Seb Dance, MEP S&D, UK“I think it’s a brilliant initiative. One of my bugbears since being elected is the design of this building, that the stairs are nowhere near the lifts and that obviously encourages people to use the lifts because they don’t know where the stairs are. So now obviously we have the initiative to show people where the stairs are and I think that’s a very important initiative. And I think that No Elevators Day is an important part of that, because it reminds people that actually staying active, being active promotes physical wellbeing and of course it prolongs life expectancy.”Nils Torvalds, MEP ALDE, Finland“In the Parliament you fairly often experience that people take the lift from just 0 to 1 or from 3 to 4 and I always get very upset because they’re stealing my time and they’re actually stealing possibilities to improve their physics [sic] also.” Ivan Štefanec, MEP EPP, Slovakia“It’s a pretty good campaign because it helps to move, it’s necessary to show people that really it’s necessary to move and to be active and also to change our habits because sometimes we have some limits and some barriers and we don’t even see what are our opportunities, so sometimes it’s good to change our ways and how to move and to use stairs instead of elevators.” Alain Lamassoure, MEP EPP, France“In this building, my office is on the 13th floor, so I manage three days a week, twice or three times a day to walk up the thirteen flights of stairs… and in the last year I managed to lose 10 kilos and be back to the weight I was when I was 30.” Margrete Auken, MEP Greens, Denmark“It’s absolutely a good idea and for sure, if you do that you don’t need to go to fitness centres and all this. Then you can just make sure you are kept alive in your body and in your brains.” Marc Tarabella, MEP S&D, Belgium“If we can sometimes take the stairs, 10 stairs or 20 stairs, it’s better than taking the lift for one floor. And I think we have to promote this behaviour, and thanks to you for doing that.”By Rachel Payne and Alexander Appleyard-Keeling 
    20 European Parliament representatives supported No Elevators Day
  • Erasmus+ funding allocation doubled in latest EU budget proposal
    On Wednesday 2 May, the European Commission outlined its initial plans for new budgets for the 2021-2027 period. The is simply the first step towards their adoption, but the early figures project a doubling of funds for the Erasmus+ programme from €15 billion for 2014-2020 to €30 billion for 2021-2027. Given that only a few areas have been highlighted to receive more money in the new budget – the EU’s flagship research programme Horizon Europe and defence research also got budget increases – this is a significant increase for the programme which supports initiatives in education, training, youth and sport. The annual funding of the programme hit a new high in 2018, with €2.7 billion allocated to it, up €200 million from 2017. At the time of this increase, the European Commissioner for Education, Culture, Youth and Sport Tibor Navracsics stated: “I am pleased that in 2018 the European Union is set to invest €2.7 billion in Erasmus+ to support extremely valuable educational projects and provide hundreds of thousands of opportunities for young Europeans to study or train abroad. The celebrations marking the 30th anniversary of Erasmus throughout 2017 have highlighted the positive impact that this EU success story has on the lives of people all over Europe. As President Juncker underlined in June, every euro invested in Erasmus+ is an investment in the future of a young person and of the European idea. I also welcome the support of several Heads of State for the idea that Erasmus+ should be far more ambitious in the future." The “ambition” referred to by Navracsics is highlighted by the “Erasmus+ x10” campaign, which advocates a tenfold increase in the Erasmus+ budget for the benefit of Europe, this train of thought was mirrored by the President of the European Commission himself, Jean-Claude Juncker, who stated during the 30th anniversary celebrations for the programme that he would like to see a nine-times increase in the budget. While a doubling of the budget is not a tenfold increase, it is still a step in the right direction for our sector! Read the full proposal here
    Erasmus+ funding allocation doubled in latest EU budget proposal
Why continuity and innovation are equally important to sports clubs: Comment by ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby
Graphic by UISP.  Last weekend I met a 70-year-old. Not a 70-year-old person, but rather a well-known member of ISCA. I joined our Italian member organisation UISP in celebrating its 70th anniversary with a seminar on advocacy for physical activity. 70 years is quite some time and we can congratulate UISP and other organisations for being able to be a relevant civil society organisation for several decades. Well done! Sport organisations both at the club level and umbrella organisation level have different histories across the globe. Some of the oldest – still existing – sport clubs are German clubs with more than 200 years of history, and Czech Sokol Organisation has over 150 years. It is quite amazing that a voluntary based civil society organisation like a sport club with few hundreds or a few thousands of members can exist for so long. That is important continuity. On the other hand, the clubs-based sport sector also depends on the development and creation of new clubs with new aims and priorities. The creation of new clubs is important for at least two reasons: First, some clubs close/stop existing so new clubs are needed. Second, sometimes development and innovation is easier by starting a new initiative or founding new clubs than changing existing ones. Assisting in the creation of new clubs and other organisations that can provide relevant activities to citizens is therefore one important task in giving citizens better access to physical activity. The diagram below is from Germany. It shows the founding year of the existing 90,000 sport clubs in Germany. (Gründungsjahr = Founding year). The data are from 2014 and show that more than 20,000 clubs (23.3%), in this case in Germany, have been founded after 1990. And it is an ongoing process. For a national sport organisation with clubs as members, the ratio of new clubs founded is an import key figure. It indicates some of the innovative dynamics. With this I wish you a good week – no matter if it will be taking part in a young club or a 70+ year-old one – as long as they are relevant. News: UISP turns 70 (in Italian)

You will like working with us!

Read more »
 

Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

Read more »
 

The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

Read more »
 
 

The 7th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week will take place on 28 May-3 June 2018. Stay tuned for the dates of MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil).

Read more »

New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you later in 2018. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

Read more »

OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

Read more »

MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

Read more »