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  • ISCA Secretary General presents good governance pledge at EU Sport Forum
    “Even some sports organisations in this room need to work on their governance,” ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg. ISCA made an official pledge today at the EU Sport Forum in Malta to keep challenging its members and partners to carry out good governance and refuse to work with organisations who are making little effort to change their poor governance practices. The pledge (pictured and presented in full at the end of this article) is one of 20 good governance posters presented at the EU Sport Forum on 8-9 March. All organisations, including ISCA, signed their pledges in the presence of Tibor Navracsics, the EU Commissioner for Education, Culture, Youth and Sport (pictured). ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg said that while many of ISCA’s members and partners have made progress in improving their governance and raising awareness among their peers in the grassroots sport sector, other stakeholders in the sport sector are still lagging behind. “When ISCA started working on good governance in 2011 together with Transparency International, we challenged our members in the grassroots sport sector and we found largely that they had no clue on good governance. And I’m glad to say that today they do and pledge to continue that work. ISCA also pledges to say what we mean and do what we say,” he told the delegates to the EU Sport Forum (see the video here). “I would like to say that the poor governance we see in other sectors of sport negatively influences the brand of sport. It therefore influences what I care about: the participation of citizens in sport and physical activity and we need to do something about that. Finally, ISCA pledges to not work with organisations that show negative or poor governance and do not show willingness to change. And I’m sorry to say, but I believe that some of these organisations are in this room today.” The EU Sport Forum gathered stakeholders in European sport, including many from the grassroots sport sector that are running projects co-funded by the EU. Jacob Schouenborg and Laska Nenova represented ISCA at the event, which concludes this afternoon. ISCA Good Governance pledge to the European Commission “IMPLEMENTATION OF GOOD GOVERNANCE PRINCIPLES Integrity is the biggest asset of sport. Insufficient governance actions have seriously challenged the integrity of sport in recent years. The current state of governance harms the brand of sport and it can unfortunately affect participation in grassroots sport and recreational physical activity. We challenge and guide members and partners to incorporate good governanceWe only engage with organisations with severe governance challenges if they demonstrate actions to changeWe are transparent because we believe in sharing – we have nothing to hideWe are working for the benefit of the citizensWe strive to “say what we mean” and “do what we say” Want more information on Good Governance in Grassroots Sport? Visit the Good Governance in Grassroots Sport website and test your own organisation's governance with our self-assessment tool. New ISCA stories on good governance What is the status of good governance and women in grassroots sport in 2017?Integrity and good governance crucial to the sector: EU report   
    ISCA Secretary General presents good governance pledge at EU Sport Forum
  • What is the status of good governance and women in grassroots sport in 2017?
    MOVE Quality’s Simone Digennaro and Antonio Saccone share their thoughts on two of sport’s biggest issues.  Slovenian ISCA member SD Partizan Skofja Loka used ISCA’s MOVE Quality programme to develop its initiative for people with intellectual disabilities “Let’s Train Together”. Antonio Saccone, from SD Partizan Skofja Loka’s international department finds out from MOVE Quality advisory board member Simone Digennaro that good governance and the status of women still have a long way to go in modern grassroots sport. From a sport perspective, beside the European Football Championships and the Olympic Games in Rio, the 2016 will be remembered as a year of change for some big international organisations. For instance, Gianni Infantino was elected as new President of FIFA, while Aleksandar Ceferin is the new President of UEFA. What can we expect now? I asked this question to Simone Digennaro, Researcher at the University of Cassino and Southern Lazio and ISCA’s MOVE Quality project advisory board member, who worked on ISCA's Good Governance in Grassroots Sport project. “They will have to work hard on their governance to earn back their credibility. Often the sport system claims autonomy and independence, but sometimes this leads to a lack of application of the basic rules and principles of common life. The issue of governance in sport is relevant and requires drastic interventions. Sport organisations need to be well organised, since they manage millions of euros and provide many people with work,” he says. In essence, “good governance” (GG) means to manage an organisation according to the law, in the best interest of the organisation and environment. The issues surrounding many major sport organisations are visible to everyone. But is GG relevant only for big organisations or also for local ones? Is it any correlation between the growing prevalence of physical inactivity with (lack of) GG at the grassroots level? “The issue of good management,” according to Simone, “is relevant for every organisation, also at the grassroots level. For example, we recently heard about sexual abuses on kids in youth teams. These are cases relevant to governance... Grassroots organisations are close to the people. Knowing about corruption in UEFA or FIFA is relevant, but at a grassroots level, without GG, a lot of damage can be done to ordinary people. The statistics show that more and more people prefer to be active independently, outside the clubs and we should reflect upon this trend... There is a need to change, to understand what people need, to get in touch with them and to engage them. GG means to go closer to the users and to tailor offers to them. Recently, I was active in the field of senior citizens, where often the programs are made without asking and engaging them. To establish relations with individuals can become an important success factor.” Skofja Loka is a Slovenian picturesque town, not far from Ljubljana. It is located at the crossroad of two valleys, on the Sora river. It is here that the SD Partizan Skofja Loka operates with nine sections and over 2000 members (in a local community of around 15,000 people). The club is among the biggest and most successful recreational sport clubs of the country. Through the project “Let’s Train Together”, the club has also engaged in its regular programs a group of people with intellectual disabilities. The initiative is aimed at gathering together people through sport and physical activity for social inclusion and development. Unlike many other sport clubs, the President, the majority of the board as well as many leaders and coaches are women. Is this a key success factor in the activity of the club? How important is the gender equality in ensuring GG? I reflected on this aspect with Simone. “Modern sport is a kind of original sin. We celebrate the Olympic Games and De Coubertin, but he was against the participation of women in sport. Many years passed before the women could participate in the Games, and many legends about unhealthy consequences of sport participation on women developed. For example, up to the 1950s, women were not supposed to run marathon, because people thought it would damage their uterus. Now we can smile about it, but these elements help us to understand the background from the past. Things have changed, participation of women is now considered important. In many countries women can cover also take up leadership positions. A lot has been done, but we still have a lot to do, since there are still some socio-cultural factors that forbid women from participating in sport.” According to Simone, “sport should reflect upon the opportunities offered to women, especially in relation to governance of sport. In Italy, we find very few organisations that have a majority of women. In many case there are no women on the board. This is a field where it will be necessary to intervene”. By Antonio Saccone, SD Partizan Skofja Loka For further information:Podcast “A ritmo di sport”, Radio Capodistria (in Italian, from min. 26’ 39”): http://4d.rtvslo.si/arhiv/l-argomento/174457342Article: The SATSport framework for effective governance in grassroots sports organisationsArticle: Exploring and Establishing a Framework For Efective Governance in European GrassrootsSports Organisations  
    What is the status of good governance and women in grassroots sport in 2017?
  • International Sport and Culture Association to launch new platform dedicated to women in sport
    The International Sport and Culture Association (ISCA) is set to launch the first European knowledge platform for women in sport as part of the Alice Milliat Foundation’s Erasmus+ supported European Network for Promotion of Women’s Sports project. The platform is aimed to be a source of inspiration that any organisation can use to discover tried-and-tested ways of promoting women’s participation at all levels of sport, particularly at a community level, in Europe and beyond. It will include a compilation of online information on women’s sports initiatives through online research. Around 60 examples are featured in the collection, and they include guidelines, recommendations, studies, toolkits, events and inspirational campaigns for women in the field of sport and physical activity. The good examples are a mixture of local, national and international (with more than 12 different countries) actions and were selected according to the following criteria: they are innovative initiatives in the community sport sector; they offer knowledge organisatons can learn from; they are inspirational examples that could be adaptable to new settings; they are proven to be sustainable. The Alice Milliat Foundation led the EU co-funded European Network for Promotion of Women’s Sports project and other partners of the project include Union Italiana Sport per Tutti (UISP, Italy), Netherlands Institute for Sport and Physical Activity, Foundation Sporting Clube de Portugal and International Sport and Culture Association. As part of the project, the partners organised two activities for women under the EU’s #BeActive European Week of Sport in 2016: the #BeActive Connected Run and the European Women’s Sport Day (Alice Milliat Challenge). The knowledge platform, in addition to these activation initiatives, ensures the project will continue to have an impact in the field of women in sport in years to come. 
    International Sport and Culture Association to launch new platform dedicated to women in sport
  • ISCA to feature on good governance in sport poster pledge at EU Sport Forum
    Photo from ISCA's Good Governance in Grassroots Sport website. ISCA will feature on one of 20 poster pledges by European organisations to promote principles of Good Governance in European Sport at the EU Sport Forum in Malta on 8-9 March. ISCA’s Jacob Schouenborg and Laska Nenova will attend the event, which invites stakeholders in sport and physical activity to share their views and initiatives supporting the EU agenda for sport. Topics covered at the forum will include grassroots sport, volunteering, and a follow-up of the high-level groups on sport diplomacy and grassroots sport. Find out more here Read the draft EU Sport Forum programme here 
    ISCA to feature on good governance in sport poster pledge at EU Sport Forum
  • ISCA welcomes proposal for WHO global physical activity action plan
    ISCA welcomes the World Health Organisation Executive Board’s endorsement of developing a global WHO action plan on revitalising physical activity for health. ISCA President, Mogens Kirkeby, says ISCA is prepared to take an active role in its development: “There is a need for a very specific focus on physical activity so we can cash in all the benefits for citizens and societies. Even though it is well documented that physical activity is a “wonder drug” which is both effective and cheap, it still has a tendency to be neglected when actions of health promotion are prioritised. We are looking forward to the development of a gobal action plan on physical activity and are happy to contribute”. Read more about the proposed plan here   
    ISCA welcomes proposal for WHO global physical activity action plan
ISCA Secretary General presents good governance pledge at EU Sport Forum
“Even some sports organisations in this room need to work on their governance,” ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg. ISCA made an official pledge today at the EU Sport Forum in Malta to keep challenging its members and partners to carry out good governance and refuse to work with organisations who are making little effort to change their poor governance practices. The pledge (pictured and presented in full at the end of this article) is one of 20 good governance posters presented at the EU Sport Forum on 8-9 March. All organisations, including ISCA, signed their pledges in the presence of Tibor Navracsics, the EU Commissioner for Education, Culture, Youth and Sport (pictured). ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg said that while many of ISCA’s members and partners have made progress in improving their governance and raising awareness among their peers in the grassroots sport sector, other stakeholders in the sport sector are still lagging behind. “When ISCA started working on good governance in 2011 together with Transparency International, we challenged our members in the grassroots sport sector and we found largely that they had no clue on good governance. And I’m glad to say that today they do and pledge to continue that work. ISCA also pledges to say what we mean and do what we say,” he told the delegates to the EU Sport Forum (see the video here). “I would like to say that the poor governance we see in other sectors of sport negatively influences the brand of sport. It therefore influences what I care about: the participation of citizens in sport and physical activity and we need to do something about that. Finally, ISCA pledges to not work with organisations that show negative or poor governance and do not show willingness to change. And I’m sorry to say, but I believe that some of these organisations are in this room today.” The EU Sport Forum gathered stakeholders in European sport, including many from the grassroots sport sector that are running projects co-funded by the EU. Jacob Schouenborg and Laska Nenova represented ISCA at the event, which concludes this afternoon. ISCA Good Governance pledge to the European Commission “IMPLEMENTATION OF GOOD GOVERNANCE PRINCIPLES Integrity is the biggest asset of sport. Insufficient governance actions have seriously challenged the integrity of sport in recent years. The current state of governance harms the brand of sport and it can unfortunately affect participation in grassroots sport and recreational physical activity. We challenge and guide members and partners to incorporate good governanceWe only engage with organisations with severe governance challenges if they demonstrate actions to changeWe are transparent because we believe in sharing – we have nothing to hideWe are working for the benefit of the citizensWe strive to “say what we mean” and “do what we say” Want more information on Good Governance in Grassroots Sport? Visit the Good Governance in Grassroots Sport website and test your own organisation's governance with our self-assessment tool. New ISCA stories on good governance What is the status of good governance and women in grassroots sport in 2017?Integrity and good governance crucial to the sector: EU report   

You will like working with us!

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 6th edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week will take place from 29 May-4 June 2017). Stay tuned for the dates for MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil).

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The MOVE Congress will not be held in 2016. Stay tuned for the dates and location of the MOVE Congress 2017. What is the MOVE Congress? See the highlights from the 2015 edition.

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MOVE Quality aims to identify initiatives which inspire more people to be physically active, build the capacity of the organisations delivering them and reward their achievements with a certificate.

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ISCA has created MOVE Transfer as a process of identifying physical activity initiatives for hard-to-reach populations that have run successfully in one setting and transferring them to a new setting (new organisation, new community).

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Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self-assessment now!

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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