ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • Bike for Europe opening cities confirmed
    Assen, in the Dutch province of Drenthe, and Thessaloniki in Greece are confirmed to send the Bike for Europe North and South teams on their big journey across Europe on 1 September. The two teams of recreational cyclists will cycle a combined distance on 2800km on their way to Vienna, Austria, to meet at the European Week of Sport celebrations in the current Presidency of the Council of the European Union on 22 September. The Bike for Europe tour aims not only to inspire people to get on their bikes and get moving in a fun way, but also to encourage communities to take action and build networks between citizens, sport clubs and refugee organisations. Through this we can make a more inclusive European society, together! Find out more about our opening cities here and join our Facebook event for updates on the tour. Bike for Europe on-route flagship events are also taking place in the following cities: Brussels, Frankfurt, Prague, Sofia, Belgrade and Budapest. Off-route events are planned in Cyprus and Poland, and registration is open for event organisers in any other European city to join – with an existing or new event celebrating cycling and physical activity. Not on the route? You can still “Bike for Europe” by donating your everyday cycling kilometres to help raise money for 100 bikes for NGOs working with refugees or support crowdfunding initiatives for refugees.
    Bike for Europe opening cities confirmed
  • MOVE Transfer: Experiences from Bulgaria
    The MOVE Transfer project has been a practical examination of how good practice from one country in regards to “Healthy Clubs” can be transposed into another place. The foundations for what constitutes a “Healthy Club” and the standards required for a “Quality Mark” to be awarded to them as a result come from Slovenia, where the Sports Union of Slovenia originally developed and initiated the idea with great success. One of the countries involved in the project has been Bulgaria, where ISCA member BG Be Active took on the challenge of implementing the good practice developed in Slovenia within Bulgaria. One of the main reasons that BG Be Active decided the model could be useful in their nation was that despite being one of the few nations in Europe which has rising activity levels, it is still one of the countries within the EU with the least active population. Furthermore, the “sporting” context in Bulgaria leans heavily towards elite and performance sport, with relatively minimal focus on entry and grassroots level sport. BG Be Active realised that to help combat the levels of inactivity some of this focus needed to be shifted towards engaging inactive members of the population. Therefore, in order to successfully implement the measures that Slovenia already had in place BG Be Active had to determine the criteria that would be suitable in a Bulgarian context, communicate to clubs and convince them that earning a “Quality Mark” would be a worthwhile venture for them, and envisage how the scheme could have success and growth going forward. From a criteria determination standpoint it was decided that to be considered a “Healthy Club” there would be a number of standards across several areas that would have to be met. These were that: the club has both appropriate infrastructure and equipment to carry out a training program; the club has a trainer/team of coaches with the right skills and experience to work safely and effectively; the training programs ran by the club are safe and efficient, and based on proven training regimes; the club has programs suitable for the inactive and beginners; and that the club has the motivation to promote regular physical activity across a range of different groups. In terms of getting clubs involved, BG Be Active had four meetings in four cities, where they presented the project to clubs. These presentations included techniques for attracting the inactive to a club, and how to ensure they become regulars once they join, and also gave tips on functional training programmes and a range of practical activities for working with inactive or novice clients, with ideas on how to develop individuals training at an appropriate level as they progress. Furthermore, step-by-step exercise guides were produced and distributed, to help both trainers and people attending the clubs know exactly which exercises are best, and the correct way to do them. At this point in the process seven clubs from four different cities have managed to fulfil these criteria, with gyms, fitness clubs and martial arts clubs showing that a range of different types of provider can achieve the “Quality Mark”. Going forward BG Be Active intends to expand the project around Bulgaria. To do this they have identified that they will need to work closely with the Ministry of Youth and Sport and the National Sport Academy, showing them how important grass-roots and entry level sport are, and also finding ways to support the clubs by establishing links with the Regional Health Inspectorate. Given how well the idea has been received by clubs so far, with increased support at the top level we can hope to see “Healthy Clubs” spread all across Bulgaria going forward! Read more about Move Transfer: http://www.nowwemove.com/move-transfer/ See what else our partner BgBEActive are doing: http://www.bgbeactive.org/
    MOVE Transfer: Experiences from Bulgaria
  • Bike for Europe Action Guide shares tips for organising a bike tour side event
    Today we proudly present our Bike for Europe Action Guide! It includes everything you need to know about the Bike for Europe tour, taking place from 1-23 September, how to organise a side event and how to promote it on social media. The guide is designed to provide brief but essential information about many aspect of Bike for Europe. It aims at sport institutions, local sport clubs and individuals to get engaged with this pan-European cycling tour either on or off its route through 11 different European countries with its ultimate destination in Vienna, Austria. The purpose of Bike for Europe is to bring Europe and its citizens closer together, promote social inclusion through sport and physical activity and to encourage people to use the bicycle as a sustainable means of transportation. These are also the reasons why we came up with the Bike for Europe Kilometre Donation Challenge. The idea is to bring Europe and its citizens working together to show their support for a more united Europe through cycling. This selfless campaign has set itself the goal of collecting 1,000,000 cycling kilometres to support the Bike for Europe cross-border cycling tour and the message of a healthy lifestyle, cycling and solidarity among Europeans. If all of us come together and collect 1,000,000 cycling kilometres, 100 bicycles will be donated to selected NGOs specialised in working with refugees. The concept is simple: Europeans get on their bikes, ride for their well-being, donate their cycled kilometres and contribute to empowering people through cycling and sport. Donate your kilometres here
    Bike for Europe Action Guide shares tips for organising a bike tour side event
  • Who is a peer educator?
    A new research report published as part of the European Youth Health Champions project challenges the notion of “peer education” as something that goes beyond age and gender and extends to community in the widest sense. The report, produced by the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH), compiles results from a literature review, focus groups, surveys and case studies involving young peer educators aged between 14 – 25 years. The findings will be used to develop a training resource through the project, which is led by StreetGames. The Report on the use and effectiveness of health peer education for young people in European countries highlights that peer education increases the knowledge and skills of those involved, revealing that the method is particularly useful for tackling sensitive issues such as sexual health, HIV prevention and domestic violence, and especially effective in promoting physical activity and healthy active lifestyles. The European Youth Health Champions project is funded by the Erasmus+ programme and, in addition to StreetGames and RSPH, the partners include Birmingham City Council (UK), International Sport and Culture Association, the Flemish Institute for Sports Management and Recreation Policy (Belgium), BG Be Active (Bulgaria) Aġenzija Żgħażagħ (Malta) and Mine Vaganti NGO (Italy). RSPH found that a wide range of factors influence the success of peer education programmes, including:The use of theory and evidence to ensure a clear understanding of what can drive behaviour change and an intervention’s outcomes.There is already a large among of evidence-based, quality resources available to support the design and evaluation of peer education programmes on a wide range of topics.A systematic and sustained approach to delivery of peer education programmes is essential.Strategies for recruitment of peer educators should aim to build a team that reflects the characteristics and diversity of the target group, the mix of personalities and learning styles.The active participation of the target audience, in this case, young people, in the design and development of interventions is highly recommended. With regard to the role, competencies and training of peer educators, the results of the primary and secondary research agreed that:Training should have clear goals and structure, but should be flexible and adaptable to different settings and contexts.Trainers and peer educators should be treated as equals through collective ownership of the content of the training and involvement in planning and evaluating.Training should take place in youth settings.Trainers should be aware of the flexible development of peer educator roles and allow participants to develop at their own pace.The most popular training methods are practical approaches, shadowing experienced leaders, group work and outdoor activities.The most important competencies for a peer educator were seen to be a combination of interpersonal skills and knowledge: communication skills, core health and wellbeing knowledge, specific topic knowledge, presentation skills and leadership.That the experience of e-learning on peer education is limited but it is seen by young people as a methodology that can be explored in combination with face-to-face training. The main output of the research has been the development of a competencies framework, to guide the development of an open access training programme for peer educators. Now the European Youth Health Champions partners are focusing on developing the project’s e-learning platform and face-to-face programme for young health peer educators, which is expected to be launched in early 2019. In the meantime, the training programme will be tested in the UK by 60 young people from Belgium, Bulgaria, Italy, Malta and the UK in June and July 2018. Download the full report on the use and effectiveness of health peer education for young people in European countries. Find out more about the European Youth Health Champions project.
    Who is a peer educator?
  • Integration of Refugees through Sport: Are you ready to #PlayTogether?
    It’s World Refugee Day and we are thrilled to share with you our first Integration of Refugees through Sport videos and resources for grassroots sport organisations to use when working on activities with refugees and other initiatives that focus on social inclusion. The Integration of Refugees though Sport projects led by ISCA and supported by Nordplus Adult and the Erasmus+ programme brought together experts from the Nordic countries, the UK, Italy and Germany to map and explore ways of integrating refugees into European societies through sport and physical activity. We also asked refugees in Denmark about their own experiences and advice for clubs, authorities and other refugees about how to reach out and take a more inclusive approach. We captured their candid and compelling responses here and in this new peer-to-peer video. The message that has recurred throughout the development of these Integration of Refugees through Sport resources is that sport and simple physical movements can be used as a momentary relief for refugees and can open doors to new social contacts and different cultures. And that sport and physical activity are also simply about people wanting to #PlayTogether. So as we share these new resources we also share them with an invitation to clubs, local authorities, refugees and local citizens to #PlayTogether.
    Integration of Refugees through Sport: Are you ready to #PlayTogether?
Bike for Europe opening cities confirmed
Assen, in the Dutch province of Drenthe, and Thessaloniki in Greece are confirmed to send the Bike for Europe North and South teams on their big journey across Europe on 1 September. The two teams of recreational cyclists will cycle a combined distance on 2800km on their way to Vienna, Austria, to meet at the European Week of Sport celebrations in the current Presidency of the Council of the European Union on 22 September. The Bike for Europe tour aims not only to inspire people to get on their bikes and get moving in a fun way, but also to encourage communities to take action and build networks between citizens, sport clubs and refugee organisations. Through this we can make a more inclusive European society, together! Find out more about our opening cities here and join our Facebook event for updates on the tour. Bike for Europe on-route flagship events are also taking place in the following cities: Brussels, Frankfurt, Prague, Sofia, Belgrade and Budapest. Off-route events are planned in Cyprus and Poland, and registration is open for event organisers in any other European city to join – with an existing or new event celebrating cycling and physical activity. Not on the route? You can still “Bike for Europe” by donating your everyday cycling kilometres to help raise money for 100 bikes for NGOs working with refugees or support crowdfunding initiatives for refugees.

You will like working with us!

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 7th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week will take place on 28 May-3 June 2018. Stay tuned for the dates of MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil).

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New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you later in 2018. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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