ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • Opening streets to become MOVEment Spaces: New partnership emerges with Colombia’s Ciclovias
    By ISCA President, Mogens KirkebyISCA and the Ciclovias Recreativas de las Americas have signed a partnership agreement to support development of more MOVEment Spaces. Opening streets for recreational physical activity is an efficient way to create accessible MOVEment Spaces for many people. Playing in the streets is not a new thing. Actually, when streets were not strongly occupied by motorised traffic they were social meeting points and places to play games, etc. With an increase of car traffic many roads became exclusive spaces for car drivers. But the concepts of ‘Open Streets’, ‘Cyclovias’, and ‘Active Streets’ around the world show how busy roads can be transformed into accessible recreational facilities – and it ‘only’ takes some political decision power and a good partnership around the practical organisation of the activities to pull it off. Different streets – different concepts‘Open Streets’ events have different formats. Many follow the concept of closing the streets for cars over a certain timeframe (often Sundays) and inviting people to bike on safe and open streets. But many ‘Open Streets’ also include events on squares and parks in connection to the main ‘Open Streets’ activity. The size of the ‘Open Street’ also differs a lot. We can see anything from a small local road of a few hundred metres closed for cars to create local social/recreational spaces, such as Birmingham City Council’s Active Streets concept. And at the other end of the scale there are roads with distances of 50-100 kilometres filled with many side events mobilising hundreds of thousands, and even millions, of citizens. Examples include the Sunday Open Streets and Cyclovias. Some organisations have taken on the responsibility to gather and share knowledge and inspiration about the concept of ‘Open Streets’. One of the best examples of this is the network of Cyclovias in the Americas. The organisation Ciclovias Recreativas de las Americas unites around 100 Ciclovias and exchange inspiration to help support the transofrmation of more streets into MOVEment Spaces. Opening streets to become MOVEment Spaces is highly recommended – and could maybe be an idea for your neighbourhood or city. Find out more about Ciclovias Recreativas de las Americas and Active Streets Birmingham UK Find out more about MOVEment Spaces  
    Opening streets to become MOVEment Spaces: New partnership emerges with Colombia’s Ciclovias
  • Bike for Europe – one month to go!
    There’s only one month between now and the start line, where two teams of recreational cyclists will begin pedalling from opposite sides of Europe as part of the Bike for Europe tour – an official European Week of Sport and NowWeMOVE event – towards the centre of Europe. The teams will depart from the Netherlands and Greece on 1 September and meet in Vienna at the opening of the European Week of Sport in Vienna on 22 September. All together they will pass through 11 countries and cycle almost 3000km raising awareness about social inclusion through physical activity and hope for a more united Europe. But the tour is not just limited to the team – there are also plenty of opportunities for cycling promoters and everyday cyclists to get involved.
    Bike for Europe – one month to go!
  • ISCA members’ sport for all festivals mark 100+ years of history
    By ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby (main graphic UMFI's National Festival poster).  As the pioneers who founded ISCA back in 1995 had their first meeting in connection to the biggest sport for all festival in Denmark (DGI's Landsstævne 1994), you could say that sport for all festivals are ingrained in ISCA’s DNA. Many of our founding members held these festivals in their countries and still do – in fact some have done so for over 100 years. This month I had the pleasure of visiting one of our member organisations Czech SOKOL’s national SLET festival in Prague. The SLET festival is held in Prague every six years, the first time in 1882, but due to various politically conditions, this was “only” SLET festival number 16. About 12,000 participants from the Czech Republic, as well many other countries, participated in the week-long festival in Prague. Czech SOKOL is one of the oldest sports organisations in Europe. It dates back to 1862, when it originated in the Czech region of Austria-Hungary. The civil society organisation focused on the body and mind, was inspired by the founder of the German ISCA member Deutscher Tuner-Bund. In various periods, SOKOL was considered to be a potential threat to the rulers and the Czech SOKOL has thus been banned for three periods. In these periods some Czech citizens also left their country and some brought the ideas of the Czech SOKOL movement to their new country. This means that the SOKOL movement and history exists in quite a few countries. In 1968, the SOKOL had a brief return but was banned again by the Soviet Union, and only after the Velvet Revolution in 1989, SOKOL appeared again and started to re-organise the organisation. SLET Gala Show 2018The SOKOL SLET festival features performances in open squares and stadiums. There are sport competitions in various locations and, as we know from other festivals, the SOKOL also arranged a SLET Gala evening which took place at the O2 Arena in Prague. 15,000 spectators saw a fascinating show featuring large selection of their many activities to a soundtrack of a rock band and an entire symphony orchestra. If you want to see some of the TV broadcast it can be found here. Icelandic UMFI’s national festival 2018In July another ISCA member also held its national festival. The 2500 inhabitants of a town called Saudarkrokur in Iceland hosted the UMFI 2018 festival. UMFI is the oldest sport and youth organisation in Iceland. It dates back to 1908 and it has carried the tradition of festival since. UMFI actually has three national festivals, an annual Youth Festival in August, a Senior Festival and a National Festival (Landsmoete) for adult participants every four years. The national festival is a combination of competitions and a lot of “come and try” events where they introduce new activities. With a host city of 2500 citizens and a total population of 350,000 people in the country, this is naturally a festival of smaller dimensions than, for example, the SLET Festival in Prague – BUT it carries the same idea and is an important manifestation of the organisation and its work. UMFI is one of the founding members of ISCA and has always been ready to contribute and participate. Both Czech Republic and Iceland (and other countries) also celebrate their 100 year anniversaries exactly this year. So in both cases the sport organisations are older than the state. Read more about the Bike for Europe event that will visit the Trees of Liberty as part of the Czech 100 years of independence celebrations. 
    ISCA members’ sport for all festivals mark 100+ years of history
  • MOVE Transfer: Experiences from Malta
    Since ISCA started the initiative in 2014, MOVE Transfer has become a practical example of how best practice can be transferred from one country to another. The most recent MOVE Transfer, supported by Erasmus+ Small collaborative Partnerships, has involved the Sports Union of Slovenia transferring the best practice “Healthy Clubs” to Bulgaria and Malta, as well as the standards required for a club to be considered as a Healthy Club and be awarded a “Quality Mark”. SportMalta took on the challenge of testing the Healthy Clubs model in Malta and implementing the ideas that were successfully deployed in Slovenia.For SportMalta the objectives for doing this were threefold: to promote the concept of a Healthy Club Quality Mark according to the criteria established in ISCA’s MOVE Quality project, to give support and assist the local sports clubs in Malta to develop further, and to be of better service to the community by providing more physical activity opportunities. The project was divided into four phases. The first phase was to promote the project with clubs, increasing its visibility and to get organisations engaged. Part of this was evaluating the clubs’ feedback and establishing how to best adapt the criteria set out in Slovenia to the Maltese context. Over the course of this stage, SportMalta received 14 applications from a range of organisations which met the criteria and progressed to the second phase, where they were given advice on how to best re-structure their programmes and promote specific activities as part of the project. The second phase was to confirm which clubs were actively interested in the project and then to start working on particular programmes and administrative logistics for the clubs in question. In practice this meant that Mojca Markovic, the project leader from Slovenia, visited the clubs that were committed to seeing the project through to its conclusion. Representatives from the clubs gave an overview of their organisational structure, gave a tour of their facilities, and gave information about their physical activity programmes targeting different age groups. During this meeting they also raised any queries they had about the project. The next stage of the project was the implementation stage, and at this stage SportMalta asked all the clubs to re-confirm their interest in the project and to submit a schedule of events. Eleven clubs re-confirmed their position and submitted the requested information. Also during this phase, cross-national partners discussed and shared best practice, developments in the project, and their experiences so far. At this point SportMalta monitored the activities of the clubs under the banner of MOVE Transfer to ensure that: qualified physical trainers were conducting each session, that health and safety regulations were observed, and that the performance of the clubs overall was improving. Constructive feedback was given to the clubs in each session, which was crucial for the clubs to keep-up with the required standards. Ultimately, the monitoring of these sessions helped SportMalta to determine which clubs would be recommended for the Quality Mark. The last phase of the project was the selection process, which determined who would be given the Quality Mark. During the last round of visits held by SportMalta, all clubs had to present an objective overview of the development of the club from the time they showed interest in the project until the present day. SportMalta based its selection process for the Healthy Club Award on the following criteria, which were: Structured, well designed sport and physical activity programmes, Unified organisational structure, Qualified trainers and coaches, Continuous quality control, Duration and frequency of the sport and physical activity programmes, and Adequate sport infrastructure and equipment. SportMalta representatives then assessed the clubs based on the criteria, and seven clubs were awarded the “Quality Mark” as a result. The clubs who fell short were encouraged to continue working towards the required standard, and assured that it was achievable for them in the future. The seven clubs chosen were :B'Bugia Sailing Club (https://birzebbugasailingclub.wordpress.com)Birkirkara St Jospeh Sports Club (www.bkarastjoseph.com)Dar Kenn għal Saħħtek (www.dks.org.mt)Għajnsielem Redcoats (www.ghajnsielemredcoats.com)Assoċjazzjoni Sportiva Hibernians (www.hiberniansbasketball.com)Marsaxlokk FCYN (https://www.facebook.com/Marsaxlokkfcnursery/)Sirens ASC (www.sirensasc.com) A presentation ceremony was then held at Marsaxlokk Football Ground on the 11th of July, where clubs and associations were invited. The Hon Parliamentary Secretary Dr Clifton Grima the Chairman of SportMalta, Dr Luciana Busuttil, and the CEO of SportMalta, Mr Mark Cutajr, presented certificates to the representatives of the clubs. Congratulations to the clubs who achieved the Quality Mark!
    MOVE Transfer: Experiences from Malta
  • Bike for Europe opening cities confirmed
    Assen, in the Dutch province of Drenthe, and Thessaloniki in Greece are confirmed to send the Bike for Europe North and South teams on their big journey across Europe on 1 September. The two teams of recreational cyclists will cycle a combined distance on 2800km on their way to Vienna, Austria, to meet at the European Week of Sport celebrations in the current Presidency of the Council of the European Union on 22 September. The Bike for Europe tour aims not only to inspire people to get on their bikes and get moving in a fun way, but also to encourage communities to take action and build networks between citizens, sport clubs and refugee organisations. Through this we can make a more inclusive European society, together! Find out more about our opening cities here and join our Facebook event for updates on the tour. Bike for Europe on-route flagship events are also taking place in the following cities: Brussels, Frankfurt, Prague, Sofia, Belgrade and Budapest. Off-route events are planned in Cyprus and Poland, and registration is open for event organisers in any other European city to join – with an existing or new event celebrating cycling and physical activity. Not on the route? You can still “Bike for Europe” by donating your everyday cycling kilometres to help raise money for 100 bikes for NGOs working with refugees or support crowdfunding initiatives for refugees.
    Bike for Europe opening cities confirmed
Opening streets to become MOVEment Spaces: New partnership emerges with Colombia’s Ciclovias
By ISCA President, Mogens KirkebyISCA and the Ciclovias Recreativas de las Americas have signed a partnership agreement to support development of more MOVEment Spaces. Opening streets for recreational physical activity is an efficient way to create accessible MOVEment Spaces for many people. Playing in the streets is not a new thing. Actually, when streets were not strongly occupied by motorised traffic they were social meeting points and places to play games, etc. With an increase of car traffic many roads became exclusive spaces for car drivers. But the concepts of ‘Open Streets’, ‘Cyclovias’, and ‘Active Streets’ around the world show how busy roads can be transformed into accessible recreational facilities – and it ‘only’ takes some political decision power and a good partnership around the practical organisation of the activities to pull it off. Different streets – different concepts‘Open Streets’ events have different formats. Many follow the concept of closing the streets for cars over a certain timeframe (often Sundays) and inviting people to bike on safe and open streets. But many ‘Open Streets’ also include events on squares and parks in connection to the main ‘Open Streets’ activity. The size of the ‘Open Street’ also differs a lot. We can see anything from a small local road of a few hundred metres closed for cars to create local social/recreational spaces, such as Birmingham City Council’s Active Streets concept. And at the other end of the scale there are roads with distances of 50-100 kilometres filled with many side events mobilising hundreds of thousands, and even millions, of citizens. Examples include the Sunday Open Streets and Cyclovias. Some organisations have taken on the responsibility to gather and share knowledge and inspiration about the concept of ‘Open Streets’. One of the best examples of this is the network of Cyclovias in the Americas. The organisation Ciclovias Recreativas de las Americas unites around 100 Ciclovias and exchange inspiration to help support the transofrmation of more streets into MOVEment Spaces. Opening streets to become MOVEment Spaces is highly recommended – and could maybe be an idea for your neighbourhood or city. Find out more about Ciclovias Recreativas de las Americas and Active Streets Birmingham UK Find out more about MOVEment Spaces  

You will like working with us!

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 7th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week will take place on 28 May-3 June 2018. Stay tuned for the dates of MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil).

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New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you later in 2018. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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