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  • How do we keep refugee integration and inclusion on the political agenda? MOVE Beyond partners prepare for first stakeholder event
    Photo: MOVE Beyond project partners take an active break at Rochdale Leisure Centre in Manchester.  Next year the partners of the EU-supported MOVE Beyond project will gather insights from their consultations with refugees, community sport and humanitarian organisation staff, as well as their pilot actions in Denmark, Italy, Sweden and the UK to convince local and international stakeholders to keep supporting integration and inclusion through sport initiatives.The third project partner meeting in Manchester, UK, addressed the challenge of changing political priorities across Europe as countries are receiving fewer asylum seekers. Despite this shifting focus, inclusion and integration remain paramount for thousands of asylum seekers and refugees who are still navigating the process of receiving permission to reside and live in new communities, and the residents who live in those communities. “In Denmark, four or five years ago, it was a big political issue to integrate refugees into our society. Now, the rhetoric is not to integrate, but to prepare these refugees to exit. That’s why we’re fighting to get refugees back on the agenda because it’s still a problem for them that they’re not so integrated,” Peter Bennett from DGI Inclusion says. Beatrice Agostini from UISP in Trento also observed during the first year of the project that while the Italian pilot project, run in cooperation with ATAS in Trento, was succeeding in creating a football team comprised of locals and asylum seekers and drawing over 100 spectators at local matches, the away games could still be fraught with hostility and exclusion. “We are still trying to raise awareness among the other teams, especially about the opportunity to join in social events after matches. We are encouraging the players and the spectators to be open and get in touch with the ‘other’, because the process of inclusion starts with them, too,” she says. Locals open doors and eyes to the potential of inclusion through sportAs part of the meeting, the project partners went on a study tour of Rochdale borough north of Manchester, where it was reported in 2017 that “every 200th person is an asylum seeker”, the highest ratio in England. A touching presentation from a former asylum seeker, Aleksandra, who now runs Saturday fitness programmes for refugee women at Rochdale Leisure Centre, shone a light on an often overlooked target group of female immigrants who are seeking asylum from abusive partners or other difficult circumstances after moving to a new country. The next stop was a visit to an asylum centre, where local Mancunian Tony volunteers his time, along with an endless supply of tea and biscuits, to run a small recreation room with a few of the residents, where everyone is invited to take a break and enjoy a game of snooker, table football or some basketball outside. The numbers of participants might vary every week, but the centre is a reliable oasis and social hub for the residents. Next step – the first stakeholder event in SwedenThe MOVE Beyond partners will meet again in April 2020 in Vänersborg, which hosts the largest accommodation and training centre for asylum seekers in Sweden, Restad Gård, which cooperates with project partner Save the Children (Rädda Barnen). Save the Children and SISU’s pilot project has focused on training refugees to carry out the focus groups for the project and the pilot project’s activities. It is an approach the puts the target group at the centre of designing new initiatives, and will be showcased at the project’s first stakeholder event in Vänersborg, which will include stakeholders from the Gothenburg area and further abroad. Multiplier events will also take place in Denmark, Italy and the UK over the course of 2020, with the final project conference and advocacy event taking place in Brussels in October.The MOVE Beyond project is co-funded by the EU's Erasmus+ programme under Collaborative Partnerships in the Field of Sport. By Rachel Payne, ISCA
    How do we keep refugee integration and inclusion on the political agenda? MOVE Beyond partners prepare for first stakeholder event
  • What does it mean to be physically literate? New ISCA project starts in 2020
    Literacy is embedded in our understanding of education as developing the ability to read and write – so what does it mean to be “physically literate”? ISCA’s newest Erasmus+ Collaborative Partnership project, “Physical Literacy for Life”, will explore this emerging concept, putting the spotlight on movement as a vital aspect of lifelong learning. The two-year project, starting in January 2020, will see experts in physical literacy from two continents join forces with grassroots sport organisations. Together, they will develop both theoretical and practical resources that can help teachers and coaches integrate the teaching of physical literacy into their delivery of physical education, physical activity and sport programmes. The resources will feature a diagram for physical literacy for all life phases, a Physical Literacy Self-Assessment and Advocacy Toolbox, and a training booklet to support teachers and coaches in promoting physical literacy as a key competence. Physical Literacy for Life is set to build on some of the groundwork made in both Europe and Australia, in particular by project partners EUPEA, which led the EU-supported Phylit project, and Dean Dudley from Macquarie University, one of the researchers who is working with Sport Australia to put physical literacy on the federal government’s health and wellbeing agenda. Physical Literacy for Life project partners: International Sport and Culture Association, Denmark (lead), European Physical Education Association (EUPEA, Switzerland), International Physical Literacy Association (UK), Macquarie University (Australia), Human Kinetics Faculty of the University of Lisbon (Portugal), University of Strasbourg (France), Steno Health Promotion Research (Denmark), BG Be Active (Bulgaria), DGI (Denmark), Sports Union of Slovenia, and UBAE (Spain). The Physical Literacy for Life project is co-funded by the EU's Erasmus+ programme under Collaborative Partnerships in the Field of Sport. By Rachel Payne, ISCA
    What does it mean to be physically literate? New ISCA project starts in 2020
  • “We’re not talking about more sport, but more physical activity”: ISCA talks to Mayor of Helsinki about new Physical Activity Programme
    Finland consistently ranks at the top of physical activity surveys in Europe and worldwide. So is a local government awareness campaign needed to get more Finns active? Absolutely, according to the Mayor of Helsinki, Jan Vapaavuori. This year, the City of Helsinki launched a Physical Activity Programme and Helsinki City Strategy to address a decline in recreational physical activity and rise in sedentary behaviour among local residents, including children. ISCA speaks to Jan Vapaavuori about the initiative and his role in spreading its campaign messages. The Helsinki Physical Activity Programme is a comprehensive initiative that focuses on the many benefits of an active lifestyle. However, in surveys of citizens’ physical activity levels Finland usually ranks at the top. So is there a need for such a specific physical activity programme in Helsinki?Jan Vapaavuori: A growing proportion of residents of Helsinki engages in at least some sports or exercise. At the same time, they spend most of their waking hours sitting or lying down. In a modern city, everyday activities can be done effortlessly with little if any physical activity. Only a fraction of people even in Finland and Helsinki get enough physical activity to support their health. Not even all children taking part in regular, supervised sports activities get enough physical activity. The City of Helsinki – like almost every city in the western world – needs a more comprehensive understanding, promotion and coordination of physical activity than before. We want to make Helsinki residents aware that everyday physical inactivity is a much bigger problem than skipping a sports class. The programme involves a lot of stakeholders and elements, including NGOs, companies, the media and researchers. What is the role of the City in this partnership?Jan Vapaavuori: Cities and municipalities are practical operators dealing with current social problems such as segregation, physical inactivity or inequality. The promotion of physical activity is primarily regarded as a matter for the Sports Department, but in fact all of the City of Helsinki’s other divisions play a more important role in creating favourable conditions for physical activity. We can raise awareness, give counselling and information and develop walkable urban areas and also act as an active platform for different kind of networks in this matter. As a municipality you are also a big employer. How are you planning to promote physical activity among staff at the workplaces of the municipalities?Jan Vapaavuori: We have almost 40,000 employees. Projects aimed at promoting physical activity at workplaces have often engaged people who are already active. Our focus is on awareness building and changing attitudes: even low levels of physical activity are beneficial. An exercise app for one-minute activity breaks has been installed on all employees’ computers. Occupational healthcare and sports services have developed a new method to activate physically inactive employees and we offer the city bike service to our employees free of charge. The Helsinki Physical Activity Programme is a cross-sector initiative involving various departments in the municipalities. Such a cross-sector perspective is often practically difficult. How can you assure that all sectors contribute to the goals?Jan Vapaavuori: The Physical Activity Programme has been prepared jointly by all of the City of Helsinki’s divisions. The City Board decided its main goals and indicators and our Executive Group monitors and evaluates the progress of it. The promotion of physical activity is integrated into the City’s basic operations, budget planning and divisional targets. We have also named this programme among the few strategic focus projects, which means precise monitoring and a continuous evolution. What is your role as Mayor in this initiative?Jan Vapaavuori: As a chair of National Sports Council in the year 2011-2012 I realised the significance of physical inactivity is a fast growing health concern. I was strongly empowered about the issue and it was one of my main goals to set this initiative in our strategy when I became mayor. It is important that City Strategy is innovative in this topic: We’re not talking about more sports, but more physical activity. As a mayor it is vital to highlight the main message of the programme, encourage employees and city divisions to think about actions out of the box, show examples of active lifestyles and to show interest in the progress and results of the programme. I have repeatedly brought the programme to our board of directors and especially encouraged cross-sector thinking. Find out more about the City of Helsinki’s new Physical Activity ProgrammeDownload the report Photo: Jetro Stavén
    “We’re not talking about more sport, but more physical activity”: ISCA talks to Mayor of Helsinki about new Physical Activity Programme
  • New Executive Committee appointed and 29 new members adopted at ISCA General Assembly
    ISCA’s Executive Committee and members gathered on Saturday 19 October, in conjunction with the 9th MOVE Congress in Budapest, Hungary, for the 2019 ISCA General Assembly and Elections. The members present appointed the ISCA President and Executive Committee for 2019-2021 and adopted 29 new members (listed at end of article), increasing ISCA’s total membership to 261. Mogens Kirkeby was re-elected as ISCA President, and Arnaud Jean from Union Française des Oeuvres Laïques d'Education Physique (UFOLEP) in France and Michael Tiemann from Deutscher Turner-Bund (DTB), Germany, were newly appointed to the Executive Committee. Philippe Machu from UFOLEP and Detlef Mann from DTB stood down from their Executive Committee posts. ISCA Executive Committee 2019-2021 (pictured above)President:Mogens Kirkeby, DGI, Denmark Vice Presidents:Maria Luiza Souza Dias, Serviço Social do Comércio, Brazil (ISCA Latin America Chair)Toni Llop Padilla, Fundació UBAE, Catalonia, Spain Members:Liliana Ortiz de La Cruz, Fundacion pro Deporte y Recreation para todos, ColombiaArnaud Jean, Union Française des Oeuvres Laïques d'Education Physique (UFOLEP), FranceMichael Tiemann, Deutscher Turner-Bund (DTB), GermanyCarlo Balestri, Unione Italiana Sport per Tutti (UISP), ItalyJakub Kalinowski, V4Sport, Poland Continental Chairpersons:Siu Yin Cheung, Gymnastics Association of Hong Kong, China (ISCA Asia Chair)Dr Jayne Greenberg, US Department of Health and Human Services, USA (ISCA North America Chair)Ashraf Mahmood, Egyptian Sports Culture Association, Egypt (ISCA Africa Chair)
    New Executive Committee appointed and 29 new members adopted at ISCA General Assembly
  • MOVE Congress 2019 one of the biggest and most active yet!
    Catch up on all the highlights, presentations, interviews and stories from the MOVE Congress. One of the world’s most active conferences, the MOVE Congress, wrapped up in Budapest on Friday 18 October with more than 470 participants, 40 speakers, and 40 Innovation Alley presenters and exhibitors having been part of the action.Catch up on the coverage from the MOVE Congress on the official event website here, where you will find stories on all of the plenary sessions and conference tracks. If you were there, see if you can spot yourself in our highlight videos and gallery on Facebook or YouTube. If you missed it, now is the time to catch up and put a mark in your calendar for the 10th edition in October 2021. You can also access the slides to most of our speakers’ presentations on our SlideShare page. Videos of full presentations will be published in the coming weeks and our plenary sessions are available now on demand here:Day 1 Keynotes: Dr Fiona Bull (World Health Organization) and Markos Aristides Kern (Fun With Balls)Day 2 Keynotes: Magnús Scheving (LazyTown Entertainment) and Darry Edwards (Primal Play)Track 4 Discovering new perspectives on physical activity promotion among school children Many thanks to all of our speakers, moderators, participants, volunteers and our organising partners - the Hungarian School Sport Federation, National School, University and Leisure Sport Federation, Hungarian University Sports Federation, Hungarian Leisure Sport Association, and the Hungarian Ministry for Human Capacities - for your support in delivering one of the biggest editions of the MOVE Congress ever! Visit the official website Photos: Ivola Bazánth and Marie Oleinik
    MOVE Congress 2019 one of the biggest and most active yet!
How do we keep refugee integration and inclusion on the political agenda? MOVE Beyond partners prepare for first stakeholder event
Photo: MOVE Beyond project partners take an active break at Rochdale Leisure Centre in Manchester.  Next year the partners of the EU-supported MOVE Beyond project will gather insights from their consultations with refugees, community sport and humanitarian organisation staff, as well as their pilot actions in Denmark, Italy, Sweden and the UK to convince local and international stakeholders to keep supporting integration and inclusion through sport initiatives.The third project partner meeting in Manchester, UK, addressed the challenge of changing political priorities across Europe as countries are receiving fewer asylum seekers. Despite this shifting focus, inclusion and integration remain paramount for thousands of asylum seekers and refugees who are still navigating the process of receiving permission to reside and live in new communities, and the residents who live in those communities. “In Denmark, four or five years ago, it was a big political issue to integrate refugees into our society. Now, the rhetoric is not to integrate, but to prepare these refugees to exit. That’s why we’re fighting to get refugees back on the agenda because it’s still a problem for them that they’re not so integrated,” Peter Bennett from DGI Inclusion says. Beatrice Agostini from UISP in Trento also observed during the first year of the project that while the Italian pilot project, run in cooperation with ATAS in Trento, was succeeding in creating a football team comprised of locals and asylum seekers and drawing over 100 spectators at local matches, the away games could still be fraught with hostility and exclusion. “We are still trying to raise awareness among the other teams, especially about the opportunity to join in social events after matches. We are encouraging the players and the spectators to be open and get in touch with the ‘other’, because the process of inclusion starts with them, too,” she says. Locals open doors and eyes to the potential of inclusion through sportAs part of the meeting, the project partners went on a study tour of Rochdale borough north of Manchester, where it was reported in 2017 that “every 200th person is an asylum seeker”, the highest ratio in England. A touching presentation from a former asylum seeker, Aleksandra, who now runs Saturday fitness programmes for refugee women at Rochdale Leisure Centre, shone a light on an often overlooked target group of female immigrants who are seeking asylum from abusive partners or other difficult circumstances after moving to a new country. The next stop was a visit to an asylum centre, where local Mancunian Tony volunteers his time, along with an endless supply of tea and biscuits, to run a small recreation room with a few of the residents, where everyone is invited to take a break and enjoy a game of snooker, table football or some basketball outside. The numbers of participants might vary every week, but the centre is a reliable oasis and social hub for the residents. Next step – the first stakeholder event in SwedenThe MOVE Beyond partners will meet again in April 2020 in Vänersborg, which hosts the largest accommodation and training centre for asylum seekers in Sweden, Restad Gård, which cooperates with project partner Save the Children (Rädda Barnen). Save the Children and SISU’s pilot project has focused on training refugees to carry out the focus groups for the project and the pilot project’s activities. It is an approach the puts the target group at the centre of designing new initiatives, and will be showcased at the project’s first stakeholder event in Vänersborg, which will include stakeholders from the Gothenburg area and further abroad. Multiplier events will also take place in Denmark, Italy and the UK over the course of 2020, with the final project conference and advocacy event taking place in Brussels in October.The MOVE Beyond project is co-funded by the EU's Erasmus+ programme under Collaborative Partnerships in the Field of Sport. By Rachel Payne, ISCA

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New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you in 2020. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

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MOVE CONGRESS

Catch up on the coverage from the 9th MOVE Congress here, where you will find stories on all of the plenary sessions and conference tracks. Speakers’ presentations are now available on our SlideShare page.

 

If you were there, see if you can spot yourself in our highlight videos and gallery on Facebook or YouTube. If you missed it, now is the time to put a mark in your calendar for the 10th edition in October 2021.

 

Visit the official MOVE Congress website

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