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  • ACTIVE Network partnership inspires Romanian mayor to invest in community leisure facilities
    ISCA’s ACTIVE Network project brought the Romanian Sport for All Association together with Falticeni municipality to collaborate on new ways to help local citizens in the municipality become more active. Their partnership is continuing as part of the ongoing network developed through the project. And now it has led to a new investment in leisure facilities that will allow citizens to enjoy their favourite physical activities all-year-round. Romanian Sport for All Federation’s Mihai Androhovici writes how the ACTIVE Network project inspired a pro-active mayor to improve infrastructure for physical activity in Falticeni Municipality. Falticeni is a former communist industrial town. At that time, many of the chemical businesses closed down and people were shifted to other jobs. Its current mayor, Mr. Catalin Coman, elected in 2012, is a professor of physical education and sport. Because the town is located near large lakes and is the gateway to the Bukovina region, Mayor Coman thought that investing in leisure would be good way to give his town a boost. He was at the ACTIVE Network project kick-off meeting in Copenhagen and also attended the MOVE Congress in Barcelona in 2013. Everywhere he went, he saw investments in local community infrastructure and in recreational buildings for citizens. Taking good examples from others home with him, he proposed to the town council to apply for EU funding through the Region Programme. What is the Region Programme? It is an institution that manages funds for regional development. In Romania it is situated in the North-East Region. This management unit of EU resources allocates money to assist with the sustainable development of local communities: administration, rehabilitation historical and cultural monuments, investments in infrastructure, environment, education, culture and sports, etc. Not all of the local councillors agreed with such an investment because the amount of co-financing must come from the local budget. They felt that it would be better to start the investment project the following year. The project was voted and approved. It has now begun and is expected to be ready by the end of this year. For the municipality this is a great responsibility in terms of financial capacity and logistics to manage the EU’s resources. It is an opportunity for development and specialisation in this field. For the community it is good news because it will create direct and indirect jobs. For the citizens of the town it will be even better because it will increase their interest in being active in summer and in winter – all seasons in fact. The leisure complex will have indoor and outdoor pools. The municipality will offer free courses for children to learn how to swim. The recreational area will also have a bike path so it will attract the citizens, especially, children to move. In addition, it will support small businesses who sell and repair bicycles. Mayor Catalin Coman’s investments are mostly related to education and health. He renovates schools but also spaces for physical education classes and sports. He also created a special program to funding private sports clubs. Personally, I am glad that the involvement of Falticeni municipality in the ACTIVE Network Project has led to the development of such ideas. I believe that through this project we have contributed with “a small drop to fill the community’s cup of ideas”. Read more about the Region Programme here Find out more about ACTIVE Network here
    ACTIVE Network partnership inspires Romanian mayor to invest in community leisure facilities
  • Jean Camy: ISCA and its members can keep voluntary sector's original vision alive
    With the EuroVolNet project, ISCA took a big step into the field of volunteering in grassroots sport. It was such a big step that it was a featured track at the SPORTVISION2012 conference, which gathered the EU’s political decision makers and European institutions during the Danish Presidency of the Council of the European Union. Jean Camy, Emeritus Professor at the University of Lyon, France, shared his expertise in the culture of volunteering through the EuroVolNet project and has continued to be a part of ISCA’s network of academic advisors ever since. He recalls how he first crossed paths with ISCA and glances at the future of volunteering in non-profit organisations. As a sociologist, my interests in education, sport, popular culture, social links, and voluntary movements and their development of our European societies, spontaneously led me to cross paths with ISCA… My first encounter with ISCA was in February 2011 in Cassino (Italy). I had been asked to contribute to ISCA’s SANTE project with a presentation on “Identifying the requirements for the qualification of effective professionals and volunteers in the coaching; health and fitness; physical education and sport management strands of the industry”. It was there that I discovered a very friendly world of people strongly dedicated to the development of sport and physical activity as part of human culture. When I was invited to contribute to another project, EuroVolNet, in September 2012, I happily jumped into that new adventure. In that project I saw the power of a group of people who were willing to go further and improve the management of their voluntary associations in pursuit of both effectiveness and better democracy. My following experiences with ISCA, either in projects (such as MOVE Quality and MOVE Transfer) or at the MOVE Congresses, have been as stimulating as the first ones. I must also say that I have always been impressed by the staff of the organisation. This is not only because of their friendliness and desire to make things easier, but because of their presence at the heart of the preparation of seminars and events, their clever and rigorous management of these meetings, and their capacity to keep participants mobilised all the way until their reach their expected achievements. To say it directly, what a tremendous balance! On the other side of its brilliant achievements, what are the challenges we can imagine for ISCA and its ever more numerous members in the coming years? Volunteering or, more broadly, involvement given freely to a cause, activity or another human being, remains the basis of life in our societies, even if dominant ideologies try to persuade us that this is not the case. Can we continue to promote a community culture based on the free engagement of its individual members? That is the first challenge most non-profit, and often volunteer associations, are facing. The second is that our citizens’ time for personal engagement is limited. That is why we have to learn from each other’s knowledge and experience so we can develop the efficiency of our organisations and keep them involved. But, and that is the third challenge, the humanistic vision and mission promoted by most voluntary or non-profit associations is now being threatened by new rules and procedures that have been developed in the context of business. It is therefore necessary to reinvent a “management” specific to voluntary associations so they avoid becoming too business-like. I think ISCA presents a great opportunity for sport for all associations to meet these challenges and keep moving forward. By working together and maintaining their positive approach and desire to improve, they will ensure that the original visions of the voluntary sector are kept alive… 
    Jean Camy: ISCA and its members can keep voluntary sector's original vision alive
  • Panna football shines at New Moves Street Festival in Copenhagen
    Panna is taking off as one of grassroots sport’s most exciting and accessible new trends, combining football, acrobatics and an interactive spectacle. Some of the world’s best street soccer players shared their tricks with the participants at the New Moves Street Festival in Copenhagen on 10 April as a prelude to English Street Cup 2015. The list of street soccer stars at the "Style of Play Jam" session was long: Jeand Doest, Sean Garnier, Soufiane Bencok El Marnissi and Tobias Becs played against everyone who wanted to challenge them, from grownups to children. The event was organised by DGI Street Soccer, Bazooka Goals, English Football Freestyle community and Copenhagen Panna House, Denmark’s only panna community which also aims to promote street culture in Denmark. With free entry, street courts and panna cages ready for action, everyone could appreciate the freestyle shows, the rookie panna tournament and Seven-to-Smoke showoff with PRO players. From 16:00 to 23:00, Sean Garnier and other great street soccer players were playing and sharing with children who came especially for them and trying to giving them a panna: a ball played between their legs. The players explained to us what freestyle and panna football means to them: “To us, Street Football means a free spirit. With our freestyle sport we take the ball and go wherever we want, then we improve our game and our style. We put our own touch on it and this is really important because we can represent our skills and style,” French star Sean Garnier. “Everything depends on where you are going – sometimes you have a lot of energy, sometimes not and you have to deal with it. It´s like a language: if you don´t speak to them they won’t be able to understand and enjoy it. So you need to connect with them and have the right energy. Most of the time we start with a freestyle show and make people gather around and afterwards they can challenge us”. Norwegian freestyle football professional Tobias Becs explains what makes panna so accessible to the public: “Freestyle it’s not the same as panna. With panna, you are interacting with people and can pick somebody out of the audience because we are on our own with the ball. You can talk to the children, and take the time to teach them some tricks,” he says. “It can take a very long time to be very good at a trick, but to learn the basics doesn’t take so much time; it’s all about showing them that it’s possible. For panna you just grab the ball and start using it on the ground. It’s much easier to pick up than freestyle. So it’s important to show the basics so they can start for there and then start freestyle.” By Jessy Boudenne 
    Panna football shines at New Moves Street Festival in Copenhagen
  • MOVE Week initiative recognised by UK Department of Health
    Jane Ellison, the UK’s Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Public Health at the Department of Health wanted to recognise the unsung local heroes of public health and to honour those people who have selflessly committed themselves to improving the health and wellbeing of their communities. In mid-February, Michal Siewniak, Community Development Officer in the Community Voluntary Services for Broxbourne and East Herts (CVSBEH) in UK, received a letter from the Department of Health inviting him at the House of Commons Terrance on 3 March 2015 where he would be presented one of these recognition awards. On receiving the letter, Siewniak suspected it could be in honour of the MOVE Week events he has coordinated in his community. After consulting the Director of Public Health at the Hertfordshire County Council, Jim McManus, he decided this was most likely the case. MOVE Week 2012 engaged 60 people in Hertfordshire. The following year, Siewniak’s team of volunteers managed to attract over 450 participants to their events. MOVE Week 2014 was even bigger, delivering 19 activities across the country and offering residents the opportunity to experience 12 different sport disciplines. “I am deliMichal Sghted that this project has been chosen out of so many successful initiatives and I am sure it will give us an extra boost to take this fantastic campaign to the next level,” Siewniak says. “It provided a fantastic platform to engage people and communities of all ages and abilities. Activities such as a badminton tournament, basketball taster sessions and health walks provided a chance for children to play and compete together with their grandparents, demonstrating how sport can help bridge the generation gap. MOVE Week helps to break down barriers, tackles social inclusion and improves community relations. It has also helped to raise the profile of other local sport and fitness clubs that get involved, encouraged by a new local grant scheme. MOVE Week shows the positive impact of sport and physical participation in our community”. Siewniak will use the award to inspire even more people to get on board for MOVE Week 2015: “I hope it will help us to build new networks, encourage wider participation and engage with wide range of groups and communities,” he says. Read more about MOVE Week in Broxbourne and East Herts at the NowWeMOVE blog here and here By Jessy Boudenne, ISCA 
    MOVE Week initiative recognised by UK Department of Health
  • Call for applications for MOVE Transfer national 2015/2016 Boost your initiative!
    Are you offering a physical activity initiative for hard-to-reach populations in your community?Would you like to transfer it to a new setting in your country?Or would you like to scale up your initiative using an innovative approach?If you answered yes, then we invite you to apply to be part of MOVE Transfer national! What is MOVE Transfer?The grassroots sport sector takes pride in sharing good practices and ISCA, as part of our ongoing work, has become aware of many practices that have proven so successful that transferring them to other settings would seem a very valuable investment. But this has not often happened. That is why ISCA created MOVE Transfer. MOVE Transfer is divided into two interrelated strands that aim to transfer and scale up good examples of grassroots sport initiatives for hard-to-reach populations: MOVE Transfer national and MOVE Transfer international. This call is for MOVE Transfer national only. MOVE Transfer national is a 10-month process which involves transferring successful initiatives from one organisation and community to another organisation and community in the same country. The process includes extensive consultation from ISCA and an advisory board appointed especially to the project. This serves to develop the capacity of the initiatives and the organisations delivering them in both settings as the transfer process is underway. MOVE Transfer is part of the NowWeMOVE campaign. What are hard-to-reach populations?There are some groups in society that are more difficult to engage in physical activity than others due to various factors, including their access to facilities, motivation, physical capabilities, lack of knowledge about where they can participate in recreation, cost and other circumstances (Dunn, Drust, Murphy & Richardson, 2012, p. 282). These groups include: •Youth with deprived backgrounds and/or with behavioural problems•Women and girls•Ethnic minorities•Elderly people•Disabled people•Homeless people How to apply - note deadline extended to 7 May7 initiatives will be selected to go through the MOVE Transfer (national) process in 2015/2016. Applications must be sent no later than on 7 May 2015 via the online form here Received applications will be reviewed for a period of 2 weeks.A decision about the selected applicants will be taken on 21 May 2015 and successful applicants will be notified by 23 May 2015. Please don't hesitate to contact us if you would like any further information and please visit the official MOVE Transfer website for more information about the initiative and the call. 
    Call for applications for MOVE Transfer national 2015/2016 Boost your initiative!
ACTIVE Network partnership inspires Romanian mayor to invest in community leisure facilities
ISCA’s ACTIVE Network project brought the Romanian Sport for All Association together with Falticeni municipality to collaborate on new ways to help local citizens in the municipality become more active. Their partnership is continuing as part of the ongoing network developed through the project. And now it has led to a new investment in leisure facilities that will allow citizens to enjoy their favourite physical activities all-year-round. Romanian Sport for All Federation’s Mihai Androhovici writes how the ACTIVE Network project inspired a pro-active mayor to improve infrastructure for physical activity in Falticeni Municipality. Falticeni is a former communist industrial town. At that time, many of the chemical businesses closed down and people were shifted to other jobs. Its current mayor, Mr. Catalin Coman, elected in 2012, is a professor of physical education and sport. Because the town is located near large lakes and is the gateway to the Bukovina region, Mayor Coman thought that investing in leisure would be good way to give his town a boost. He was at the ACTIVE Network project kick-off meeting in Copenhagen and also attended the MOVE Congress in Barcelona in 2013. Everywhere he went, he saw investments in local community infrastructure and in recreational buildings for citizens. Taking good examples from others home with him, he proposed to the town council to apply for EU funding through the Region Programme. What is the Region Programme? It is an institution that manages funds for regional development. In Romania it is situated in the North-East Region. This management unit of EU resources allocates money to assist with the sustainable development of local communities: administration, rehabilitation historical and cultural monuments, investments in infrastructure, environment, education, culture and sports, etc. Not all of the local councillors agreed with such an investment because the amount of co-financing must come from the local budget. They felt that it would be better to start the investment project the following year. The project was voted and approved. It has now begun and is expected to be ready by the end of this year. For the municipality this is a great responsibility in terms of financial capacity and logistics to manage the EU’s resources. It is an opportunity for development and specialisation in this field. For the community it is good news because it will create direct and indirect jobs. For the citizens of the town it will be even better because it will increase their interest in being active in summer and in winter – all seasons in fact. The leisure complex will have indoor and outdoor pools. The municipality will offer free courses for children to learn how to swim. The recreational area will also have a bike path so it will attract the citizens, especially, children to move. In addition, it will support small businesses who sell and repair bicycles. Mayor Catalin Coman’s investments are mostly related to education and health. He renovates schools but also spaces for physical education classes and sports. He also created a special program to funding private sports clubs. Personally, I am glad that the involvement of Falticeni municipality in the ACTIVE Network Project has led to the development of such ideas. I believe that through this project we have contributed with “a small drop to fill the community’s cup of ideas”. Read more about the Region Programme here Find out more about ACTIVE Network here

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NowWeMOVE is a European-wide campaign to promote sport and physical activity. The cross-sector vision of the campaign to get “100 million more Europeans active in sport and physical activity by 2020”. MOVE Week is an annual Europe-wide event and an integral part of the NowWeMOVE campaign. This year, MOVE Week will take place from 29 September to 5 October.

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This year one of Europe’s oldest, most populated and most visited cities will provide a fitting backdrop for the MOVE Congress 2014 and its theme Open city – Active city. from 22 to 25 October 2014 in Rome-Italy.

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MOVE Quality aims to identify initiatives which inspire more people to be physically active, build the capacity of the organisations delivering them and reward their achievements with a Quality Mark.

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ISCA has created MOVE Transfer as a process of identifying physical activity initiatives for hard-to-reach populations that have run successfully in one setting and transferring them to a new setting (new organisation, new community).

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Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self assessment now!

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Active Network

The ACTIVE Network project has identified partnerships between local authorities and sport organizations to be of such critical value...

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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