ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • IPLA’s Nigel Green on Physical Literacy for Life: “There is a golden thread of bringing different organisations together”
    The International Physical Literacy Association (IPLA) is a community of people who promote physical literacy throughout the course of life. We had a conversation with Nigel Green from IPLA about this concept at the kick-off meeting for ISCA’s Erasmus+ Collaborative Partnership Physical Literacy for Life. What is the difference between physical literacy, physical education, and physical activity?Physical literacy is a lifelong concept. It starts at our birth and ends at our death, it is our body’s interaction with the environment from the holistic physical point of view. Physical education is a period when we are at school, usually between the age of four and 18. It comes with a specific focus. Physical activity can range from daily activities like walking and cycling to sport activities. You have been doing some work in the field of physical literacy in Asia. Can you tell more about it?I was fortunate to be invited to India two years ago. Three schools wanted to redesign their physical education programs, so I went to work with over 40 teachers for two weeks. My aim was to introduce them to the concept of physical literacy and make it as a focus in their physical education practices. I found out that their practices were quite traditional, so now I have been out there five times, working with the teachers on their professional development but also in the field. I encourage them to ensure that the lessons don’t only have the physical benefits, but also cognitive. About 18 months ago I went to share the concept of physical literacy in Taiwan. It happened at exactly the right time because they were looking to modify the physical education there. I worked with a group of 80 teachers and once again used physical literacy as the key concept to underpin or overarch physical education. I am excited to go back there in another month to continue the work. Is there anything you find challenging about translating the concept of physical literacy into other cultures?Not really. Once you explain the concept, most people get it and can relate it to their culture. The first time I went to India, the group we were working with could see the holistic, inclusive, lifelong nature of physical literacy very quickly. It really resonated with them. Physical education in Taiwan had gone from skills-based to fun-based; they lost the personal and holistic aspects of it, but once I explained physical literacy to them, they immediately saw how it could fit into their revision of physical education. How can the Physical Literacy for Life project build onto the momentum created by the concept?The beauty of this project is that it unites a range of people from different countries who have all been on their own learning journey in relation to physical literacy. It gives them an opportunity to share their experiences, come together and create a clear vision of how the concept of physical literacy can move forward. There is a golden thread of bringing different organisations together, whether they are working with health, children, adults, community, coaches or teachers. This project brings everyone together to promote physical activity for everyone, for life. The Physical Literacy for Life project is co-funded by the EU's Erasmus+ programme under Collaborative Partnerships in the Field of Sport.By Marie Oleinik, ISCA
    IPLA’s Nigel Green on Physical Literacy for Life: “There is a golden thread of bringing different organisations together”
  • Presenting the new-look ISCA Annual Report for 2019
    Today is a big day for the International Sport and Culture Association (ISCA). Not only are we celebrating our 25th birthday, but we are also ready to present to you our new-look Annual Report for the year 2019. The original idea of ISCA's founders was to unite the voices and organisations who believe in the power of recreational sport and physical activity. We still believe in this ‘power of the people’, and enabling the human right to access sport and physical activity is still our mission. For 25 years we have delivered solutions to our members and the sport sector. These solutions help civil society organisations to develop as organisations and continue to be able to deliver attractive and motivating programmes to individuals and communities. We have shared ideas across borders and cultures. We have invented new tools, new campaigns and new concepts. All to promote and improve the sport sector and ultimately increase citizens’ participation in recreational sport and physical activity. We highlight the solutions, campaigns and advocacy efforts we delivered together with our members and partners in 2019. Browse the report by clicking here or below
    Presenting the new-look ISCA Annual Report for 2019
  • ISCA turns 25 today! “Thank you for your contributions and involvement in ISCA”
    By ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby.  Today we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the International Sport and Culture Association. 25 years ago, the founding members had an interest in open collaboration and sharing inspiration in recreational sport or sport for all, as it was called. They identified the need to connect organisations from different countries and cultures, and as a result they founded ISCA. Today we are more than 250 member organisations who support the idea of uniting, sharing and collaborating. During 2020 we will use various occasions to celebrate this anniversary. We will look back into our history and we will discuss the future of recreational sport and physical activity and, not least, our future priorities. On behalf of the Executive Committee and the Secretariat, I would like to thank you for your contributions and involvement in ISCA. Let’s continue Moving People. Watch the full mesage from Mogens Kirkeby in this videoImage below, 1995 to 2020: The first official ISCA photo was taken of representatives of the founding members in front of a liberty column in Copenhagen, which symbolises the ‘right to move’ and was given to the Danish people by the King in 1788. We took the opportunity to take a picture the same place 25 years later - our staff may be different, but our goal is the same: Moving People!
    ISCA turns 25 today! “Thank you for your contributions and involvement in ISCA”
  • 25 MOVES that changed the game for ISCA and our sector
    To create change you need to MOVE first, make the right MOVEs, and keep MOVING ahead. Over the past 25 years, ISCA has done just that. As ISCA turns 25 in 2020, we look back at 25 game-changing MOVEs that helped propel our organisation and the physical activity sector forward. 1995-2010Forming an international umbrella for sport for all28 sport for all organisations establish the International Sport and Culture Association on 10 February 1995 Challenging the Pyramid ModelISCA is the first sport organisation to challenge the Pyramid (participation feeding elite) Model of Sport Development Connecting sport and healthISCA members, led by German Gymnastics Federation, strengthen the links between recreational sport and health From sport for all to MOVEISCA adopts the term “MOVE” as a brand encompassing all aspects of sport and physical activity MOVE CongressSport for All Congress evolves into an active conference format for physical activity promoters worldwide  2011-2015Becoming a major project incubatorISCA is one of the most successful organisations in securing EU funding for projects – enabling us to build the capacities of hundreds of likeminded organisations Youth on the MOVEISCA’s 60+ European Voluntary Service volunteers and 200+ youth project participants become physical activity change-makersISCA President brings 5 teddy bears to European ParliamentTo illustrate that 300 out of 500 million Europeans are insufficiently physically active and gather support for ISCA’s “100 million people more active” (NowWeMOVE) campaign NowWeMOVE campaignExpands across Europe, to Latin America, then globally with a year-round calendar of events MOVE Week“100 million more” vision and “MOVE” combine to create a week of physical activities 3 years before the European Week of Sport MOVE AgentsISCA invents the term MOVE Agents to describe individuals, organisations and entities who move people#FindYourMOVE NowWeMOVE slogan reveals the secret to getting active is “finding the move that moves you”Good Governance in Grassroots SportProvides the biggest part of the sport sector (grassroots sport) with tools to assess and improve governance NowWeMOVE songMOVE Congress 2014 participants compose a NowWeMOVE campaign theme tune in 2 days! #FindYourMOVE MascotISCA triangle is transformed into a mascot promoting the #FindYourMOVE message Inactivity Time BombAdvocacy campaign reveals the cost of physical inactivity in Europe is a staggering 500,000 deaths and €80 billion annually No Elevators DayA simple message to “Take the Stairs” spreads across the world on social media, to the European Parliament, several national parliaments and companies NowWeBike tours Physical activity ambassadors on 2 wheels cycle across Europe to promote active transport and European solidarity  2016-2020FlashMOVENowWeMOVE flashmob gets over 9000 people in 155 cities dancing simultaneously MOVEment PillsPill boxes that prescribe a health-enhancing drug called “physical activity”MOVEment SpacesA new way to view and redesign public space: as a space for people to be active Human Right to MOVEFirst NGO to adopt the Council of Europe Tbilisi Declaration protecting human rights in sport, in line with our mission to “empower organisations worldwide to enable citizens to enjoy their human right to move” Grassroots Sport DiplomacyInvented the term and concept Grassroots Sport Diplomacy underlining the potential of civil society to engage in international relations ISCA Awards“Alternative” award show with Lego trophies delivered to owners of best practices by skateboard MOVE Transfer EU-ChinaOpening doors for grassroots sport leaders to experience unique intercontinental exchanges Watch this space for more ISCA 25th Anniversary "flashbacks"
    25 MOVES that changed the game for ISCA and our sector
  • EUPEA's Rose-Marie Repond on Physical Literacy for Life: "This project is all about going from philosophy to action”
    The first week of February 2020 turned out to be busy for ISCA and a number of international experts who gathered in Copenhagen for the kick-off meeting of the Physical Literacy for Life project. ISCA’s latest Erasmus+ Collaborative Partnership initiative aims to put the spotlight on movement as an integral part of lifelong learning.  Experts from different areas of the physical education sector are excited to work together to develop resources for teachers and coaches to integrate the concept of physical literacy into the curriculum. Rose-Marie Repond from the European Physical Education Association (EUPEA) shares her thoughts in the interview below. Why is it important to be physically literate?Physical literacy is an essential part of people’s well-being, but it is also a learning component of life in general. Everyone should have the opportunity to be physically literate. If people can be literate in the way that they read and write, they should also be literate in the way they move. What is the difference between physical literacy and physical education?Physical education is a part of physical literacy. In order to have a healthy society, we need physical education, physical activity, school sport and everything related to health in general. How does the Physical Literacy for Life project build onto the previous Erasmus+ project Phylit?Phylit was a small collaborative project. We saw that in a lot of the European schools’ curricula there was nothing about physical education or physical literacy at all. Naturally, with these projects we are aiming to close the gap in physical literacy next to numeracy and language literacy. What are you looking forward to the most in the Physical literacy for Life project?A lot! First of all, we have an amazing group of experts and a lot of knowledge. There is so much opportunity. We have the scientific part and practitioners working in the field. This project is all about going from philosophy to action. The Physical Literacy for Life project is co-funded by the EU's Erasmus+ programme under Collaborative Partnerships in the Field of Sport. By Marie Oleinik, ISCA 
    EUPEA's Rose-Marie Repond on Physical Literacy for Life: "This project is all about going from philosophy to action”
IPLA’s Nigel Green on Physical Literacy for Life: “There is a golden thread of bringing different organisations together”
The International Physical Literacy Association (IPLA) is a community of people who promote physical literacy throughout the course of life. We had a conversation with Nigel Green from IPLA about this concept at the kick-off meeting for ISCA’s Erasmus+ Collaborative Partnership Physical Literacy for Life. What is the difference between physical literacy, physical education, and physical activity?Physical literacy is a lifelong concept. It starts at our birth and ends at our death, it is our body’s interaction with the environment from the holistic physical point of view. Physical education is a period when we are at school, usually between the age of four and 18. It comes with a specific focus. Physical activity can range from daily activities like walking and cycling to sport activities. You have been doing some work in the field of physical literacy in Asia. Can you tell more about it?I was fortunate to be invited to India two years ago. Three schools wanted to redesign their physical education programs, so I went to work with over 40 teachers for two weeks. My aim was to introduce them to the concept of physical literacy and make it as a focus in their physical education practices. I found out that their practices were quite traditional, so now I have been out there five times, working with the teachers on their professional development but also in the field. I encourage them to ensure that the lessons don’t only have the physical benefits, but also cognitive. About 18 months ago I went to share the concept of physical literacy in Taiwan. It happened at exactly the right time because they were looking to modify the physical education there. I worked with a group of 80 teachers and once again used physical literacy as the key concept to underpin or overarch physical education. I am excited to go back there in another month to continue the work. Is there anything you find challenging about translating the concept of physical literacy into other cultures?Not really. Once you explain the concept, most people get it and can relate it to their culture. The first time I went to India, the group we were working with could see the holistic, inclusive, lifelong nature of physical literacy very quickly. It really resonated with them. Physical education in Taiwan had gone from skills-based to fun-based; they lost the personal and holistic aspects of it, but once I explained physical literacy to them, they immediately saw how it could fit into their revision of physical education. How can the Physical Literacy for Life project build onto the momentum created by the concept?The beauty of this project is that it unites a range of people from different countries who have all been on their own learning journey in relation to physical literacy. It gives them an opportunity to share their experiences, come together and create a clear vision of how the concept of physical literacy can move forward. There is a golden thread of bringing different organisations together, whether they are working with health, children, adults, community, coaches or teachers. This project brings everyone together to promote physical activity for everyone, for life. The Physical Literacy for Life project is co-funded by the EU's Erasmus+ programme under Collaborative Partnerships in the Field of Sport.By Marie Oleinik, ISCA

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you in 2020. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

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MOVE CONGRESS

Catch up on the coverage from the 9th MOVE Congress here, where you will find stories on all of the plenary sessions and conference tracks. Speakers’ presentations are now available on our SlideShare page.

 

If you were there, see if you can spot yourself in our highlight videos and gallery on Facebook or YouTube. If you missed it, now is the time to put a mark in your calendar for the 10th edition in October 2021.

 

Visit the official MOVE Congress website

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